Immunopathology Type 3, Immune Complex Disease Flashcards Preview

Lindsey's Blood and Lymph Unit III > Immunopathology Type 3, Immune Complex Disease > Flashcards

Flashcards in Immunopathology Type 3, Immune Complex Disease Deck (26)
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1

____ and ____ attract neutrophils, which release cathepsin G, elastase, and hydrogen peroxide, causing degradation of the BM.

C3a; C5a

2

What are the treatments of Type 3 immunopathologies?

anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants, antihistamines, plasmapheresis

3

What is post-strep glomerulonephritis?

immune complexes in the kidney 10-14 days after a strep infection

3

What is Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis?

actinomycetes bacteria exposure causes development of IgG antibodies; on 2nd exposure, antigen/antibody complexes form in the lungs

5

How large is IgM?

750,000 daltons

5

What pathology of SLE makes it a type 3 disease?

pt makes IgG antibody to ds DNA; immune complexes deposit in the kidneys

6

What is the reticuloendothelial system (RES)?

all the macs/phagocytes of the tissues

7

As anaphylatoxins, C3a and C5a release ____ and other mediators from mast cells, increasing the inflammatory rxn.

histamine

7

What cells cause the symptoms of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis?

neutrophils and complement initially; Th1 and Th2 in chronic cases

7

What pathology of RA makes it a type 3 disease?

an IgM autoantibody to one's own IgG

8

What is the Arthus reaction?

immune complex formation from booster immunizations- activates complement and neutrophils; causes soreness at injection site

10

As anaphylatoxins, ___ and ____ release histamine and other mediators from mast cells, increasing the inflammatory rxn.

C3a; C5a

11

What is an immune complex formation from booster immunizations that activates complement and neutrophils; causes soreness at injection site?

the Arthus reaction

12

How do immunocomplexes activate complement?

they bind C1q to initiate the classical cascade

13

As anaphylatoxins, C3a and C5a release histamine and other mediators from ____, increasing the inflammatory rxn.

mast cells

13

What disease is caused by actinomycetes bacteria exposure causing development of IgG antibodies; on 2nd exposure, antigen/antibody complexes form in the lungs?

Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

15

How is the risk of serum sickness minimized?

by affinity purification and by cutting off the Fc portion of the protein and only using the F(ab) or F(ab2)

16

How can you test for the presence of immune complexes?

1. total hemolytic complement will be low; check lysis of RBCs using pts serum as compared to a standard 2. bind serum to complement C1q to look for complex agglutination 3. check for RF by adding pt's serum to IgG coated microbeads 4. perform a renal biopsy, immunotag, and look for lumpy bumpy appearance

18

What is serum sickness?

the binding of antibody to exogenous serum, forming immune complexes that accumulate until large enough that the RES can clear it out

20

C3a and C5a attract _____, which release cathepsin G, elastase, and hydrogen peroxide, causing degradation of the BM.

neutrophils

21

What is IgA nephropathy?

deposition of IgA and IgG bound to IgA1 in the renal glomerulus

22

What size immunocomplex can activate complement but is too small to be removed by the RES?

1 million daltons

23

Name 6 places immune complexes can lodge.

1. joints 2. pleura 3. peritoneum 4. skin 5. choroid plexus 6. kidneys

24

C3a and C5a attract neutrophils, which release ____, ____, and ____, causing degradation of the BM.

cathepsin G, elastase, and hydrogen peroxide

25

What does RES stand for?

reticuloendothelial system

26

What is a type 3 immunopathology?

immune complexes get stuck in basement membranes