Immunopathology Type 2, Autoimmunity Flashcards Preview

Lindsey's Blood and Lymph Unit III > Immunopathology Type 2, Autoimmunity > Flashcards

Flashcards in Immunopathology Type 2, Autoimmunity Deck (83)
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1

What are the treatments of Dressler Syndrome?

anti-inflammatory agents

2

What is rheumatoid factor (RF)?

IgM anti-IgG in RA

3

People with SLE can make autoantibodies to _____, ____, ____, _____, _____, _____, _____, and _____.

nuclear proteins, DNA, RNA, RBCs, clotting factors, platelets, skin, T cells

3

When can passive antibodies cause diseases?

1. hemolytic disease of the newborn 2. mismatched transfusions 3. children of mothers with myasthenia gravis or SLE

4

Who gets Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA)?

pts who recently had a viral infection; have a different autoimmune disease; hx of cancer

5

How does the immunofluorescence appear in Goodpasture Syndrome cells?

sharp, linear

6

What are the s/s of Goodpasture Syndrome?

persistent glomerularnephritis, pneumonitis, pulmonary hemmorhages

7

What is Dressler Syndrome?

autoantibodies to the heart post MI or heart surgery

8

Platelets are phagocytosed via _____ damage in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

complement-mediated

8

What is Goodpasture Syndrome?

autoantibodies to lung and kidney BM

8

What is chronic beryllium disease (CBD)?

an allergic response and lung disease due to beryllium exposure/poisoning

8

What is a good diagnostic marker in Celiac disease?

antibody to tissue transglutaminase

9

What causes Rheumatic Heart Disease?

a cross reaction of group A strep M-protein antigen and laminin on heart valves, followed by neutrophil-mediated tissue destruction

9

SLE is much more common in ____, pointing to an ____ effect.

females; Estrogen

10

Dressler Syndrome is seen in _____.

patients who had a MI or heart surgery

10

If you have a sample of the patient's tissue, you can use the _____ test for autoimmunity.

direct

11

What is the treatment for inappropriate tachycardia?

a beta blocker (propranolol)

12

What is a sequestered antigen?

antigens that cannot get into the system until an immune response is started in another way

14

What is stimulatory hypersensitivity?

autoantibody to receptor activates it (agonist)

14

What is the hallmark test for autoimmunity?

immunofluorescence

15

What is Aire?

a thymic transcription factor

15

What is an innocent bystander?

normal tissue that is damaged because it's near or associated with antigen

16

Name a physical sign characteristic of SLE.

facial butterfly rash

16

RA is linked to the gene _____.

PADI4

17

How does complement-mediated damage harm tissue?

lysis, phagocytosis, lysosomal enzymes and ROS

17

Why do disease states persist, even when the initial antigen is long gone?

autoimmune responses to normally sequestered antigens released from damaged cells

18

Lysis of ____ occurs in autoimmune hemolytic anemia via complement-mediated damage.

RBCs

19

If you have a sample of the patient's serum, you can use the _____ test for autoimmunity.

indirect

21

What are the hallmarks of type 2 immune diseases?

1. IgG, IgM, or IgA autoantibody mediated (harm to self) 2. can stimulate or damage the cell

22

Lysis of RBCs occurs in _____ via complement-mediated damage.

autoimmune hemolytic anemia