CHAPTER 6 EXISTENTIAL THERAPY Flashcards Preview

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1

A Danish and German word whose
meaning lies between the English words dread
and anxiety. This term refers to the uncertainty
in life and the role of anxiety in making decisions
about how we want to live.







Angst

2

A condition that results from having to
face choices without clear guidelines and without
knowing what the outcome will be.

Anxiety

3

An inescapable aspect of the human
condition; we are the authors of our lives and
therefore are responsible for our destiny and accountable
for our actions

Freedom

4

A philosophical movement
stressing individual responsibility for creating
one’s ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving.

Existentialism

5

A condition of emptiness
and hollowness that results from meaninglessness
in life.

Existential vacuum

6

Seeks a balance between
recognizing the limits and the tragic dimensions
of human existence and the possibilities and opportunities
of human life.

Existential tradition

7

Feelings of despair and
anxiety that result from inauthentic living, a failure
to make choices, and avoidance of responsibility.

Existential neurosis

8

The result of, or the consciousness
of, evading the commitment to choosing
for ourselves.

Existential guilt

9

An outcome of being confronted
with the four givens of existence: death,
freedom, existential isolation, and meaninglessness.

Existential anxiety

10


The process of creating, discovering,
or maintaining the core deep within one’s
being; the process of becoming the person one is
capable of becoming.
Existential analysis (dasein analyse) The emphasis
of this therapy approach is on the subjective
and spiritual dimensions of human existence.

Authenticity

11


The process of creating, discovering,
or maintaining the core deep within one’s
being; the process of becoming the person one is
capable of becoming.
Existential analysis (dasein analyse) The emphasis
of this therapy approach is on the subjective
and spiritual dimensions of human existence.

Authenticity

12

Core or universal
themes in the therapeutic process: death, freedom,
existential isolation, and meaninglessness.
Inauthenticity Lacking awareness of personal
responsibility and passively assuming that our
existence is largely controlled by external forces.






“Givens of existence”

13

The fact of our interrelatedness
with others and the need for us to struggle
with this in a creative way.

Intersubjectivity

14

A state of functioning
with a limited degree of awareness of oneself and
being vague about the nature of one’s problems.
Self-awareness The capacity for consciousness
that enables us to make choices.

Restricted existence

15

From an existential-humanistic
perspective, resistance manifests as a failure to
be fully present both during the therapy hour
and in life.

Resistance

16

Both a condition and goal of therapeutic
change, which serves the dual functions
of reconnecting people to their pain and attuning
them to the opportunities to transform their pain.

Presence

17

A method of exploration that
uses subjective human experiencing as its focus.
The phenomenological approach is a part of the
fabric of existentially oriented therapies, Adlerian
therapy, person-centered therapy, Gestalt
therapy, and reality therapy.

Phenomenology

18

An appropriate response to an
event being faced.

Normal anxiety

19

Developed by Frankl, this brand
of existential therapy literally means “healing
through reason.” It focuses on challenging clients
to search for meaning in life.

Logotherapy

20

A response out of proportion
to the situation. It is typically out of awareness
and tends to immobilize the person.

Neurotic anxiety

21

T F 1. The key concepts of the existential
approach can be integrated into
most therapeutic approaches.

t

22

T F 2. Existential therapists show wide
latitude in the techniques they
employ.

t

23

T F 3. According to Sartre, existential guilt
is the consciousness of evading commitment
to choose for ourselves.

t

24


T F 4. Existentialists maintain that our experience
of aloneness is a result of
our making inappropriate choices.

f

25

T F 5. Techniques are secondary in the
therapeutic process, and a subjective
understanding of the client is
primary.

t

26

T F 6. To its credit, existential therapy is
compatible with the trend toward
evidence-based practice.

f

27

T F 7. Part of the human condition is that
humans are both free and responsible.

t

28

T F 8. Anxiety is best considered as a neurotic
manifestation; thus, the principal
aim of therapy is to eliminate anxiety.

f

29

T F 9. Emmy van Deurzen has made signifi
cant contributions to the development
of existential therapy in the
United Kingdom through her writing
and teaching.

t

30

T F 10. The existential approach is a reaction
against both psychoanalysis
and behaviorism

t