Chapter 1 4 Family Systems Therapy Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 1 4 Family Systems Therapy Deck (58)
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1

An approach that is
based on the premise that parents and children
often become locked in repetitive, negative interactions
based on mistaken goals that motivate
all parties involved.

Adlerian family therapy

2

In structural family therapy, an
emotional barrier that protects individuals
within a system.

Boundary

3

Bowen’s and Whitaker’s view of the
role of the therapist in assisting clients in the
process of differentiating the self.

Coaching

4

An alliance between two people
against a third.

Coalition

5

An early human validation
process model developed by Virginia Satir
that emphasizes communication and emotional
experiencing.

Conjoint family therapy

6

Bowen’s concept of psychological
separation of intellect and emotions
and of independence of the self from others. The
greater one’s differentiation, the better one’s ability
to keep from being drawn into dysfunctional
patterns with other family members.

Differentiation of self

7

Minuchin’s term for a family
organization characterized by psychological isolation
that results from rigid boundaries.

Disengagement

8

In structural family therapy, an intervention
consisting of a family playing out its
relationship patterns during a therapy session so
that the therapist can observe and then change
transactions that make up the family structure.

Enactment

9

Minuchin’s term referring to
a family structure in which there is a blurring
of psychological boundaries, making autonomy
very diffi cult to achieve.

Enmeshment

10

A therapeutic approach
that emphasizes the value of the therapist’s realness
in interacting with a family.

Experiential therapy

11

The inability of a family
to attain harmonious relationships and to
achieve interdependence.

Family dysfunction

12

The series of events that
marks an individual’s life within a family, from
separation from one’s parents to marriage to
growing old and dying.

Family life cycle

13

Satir’s experiential
technique in which clients retrace their family
history for the purpose of gaining insight into
current family functioning.

Family life-fact chronology

14

The original nuclear family
into which one was born or adopted.

Family of origin

15

The implicit agreements that prescribe
the rights, duties, and range of appropriate
behaviors within the family.

Family rules

16

A nonverbal experiential
technique that consists of physically arranging
members of a family in space, which revealssignifi cant aspects of their perceptions and feelings
about one another.

Family sculpting

17

The functional organization
of a family, which determines interactional patterns
among members.

Family structure

18

A family in which the needs
of the individual members are met and there
is a balance of interdependence and autonomy
among members.

Functional family

19

A schematic diagram of the family
system, usually including at least three generations;
employed by many family therapists to identify
recurring behavior patterns within the family.

Genogram

20

Family functioning
based on generational boundaries that involve
parental control and authority.

Hierarchical structure

21

An experiential
and humanistic approach developed by
Virginia Satir, which viewed techniques as being
secondary to the relationship a therapist develops
with the family.

Human validation process model

22

A family member who carries
the symptom for a family and who is identifi
ed by the family as the person with the problem.
In genograms this person is the index person.
Joining In structural family therapy, accommodating
to a family’s system to help the members
change dysfunctional patterns.

Identifi ed patient

23

An approach
that operates on the premise that a predictable
pattern of interpersonal relationships
connects the functioning of family members
across generations.

Multigenerational family therapy

24

The way in which dysfunctional patterns are passed
from one generation to the next.

Multigenerational transmission process

25

This perspective serves as a basic structure for assessment both of the family members and the system.

Multilayered process of family therapy

26

A technique in strategic
family therapy whereby the therapist directs family
members to continue their symptomatic behavior.
Change occurs through defying the directive.

Paradoxical directive

27


These models seek to reduce or eliminate
the power and impact of the family therapist.
They include solution-focused and solution-oriented
therapies as well as narrative therapy.

Postmodern approaches to family therapy

28

Relabeling a family’s description of
behavior by putting it into a new and more positive
perspective.

Reframing

29

A therapeutic approach
whereby the therapist develops a specific plan
and designs interventions geared toward solving
a family’s presenting problems.

Strategic therapy

30

A therapeutic approach directed
at changing or realigning the organization
of a family to modify dysfunctional patterns and
clarify boundaries.

Structural therapy