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1

What is social cognition?

The way we interpret, analyse, remember and use information about the social world

2

What is the main model for how we form impressions of others?

Asch's configuration model

3

Who came up with the configuration model of how we form impressions of others?

Asch

4

What is Asch's configurational model?

How we form impressions of others

Central traits: Have a strong influence over impressions

Peripheral traits: Have less of an influence over impressions

Some traits are more important than others.

5

What are central traits?

Asch's configuration model:

Traits that have a strong influence over how we form impressions of others

6

What are peripheral traits?

Asch's configuration model:

Traits that have a weak influence over how we form impressions of others

7

What biases do we have in forming impressions of others?

Primacy effect: Traits presented first have more influence over final impressions

Regency effect: Traits presented last have more influence over final impressions

Negativity: In the absence of negative information, we assume the best in others. But when given negative information, it has a strong influence

8

What is the primacy effect?

Traits presented first have more influence over final impressions

9

What is the regency effect?

Traits presented last have more influence over final impressions

10

What are personal constructs?

Our individual ways of organising and catergorising people such as by humour or intelligence

11

What is the halo effect?

We have better opinions of people who are physically attractive

12

What are some types of schemas?

Person
Role
Script
Self

13

Why do we catergorise and use schemas?

To save time and mental energy

To provide meaning for objects and reduce uncertainty

14

What are associative networks/memory?

Where ideas are linked by association. Recalling one idea makes it easier to recall those that are associated with it

15

What are stereotypes?

They are widely shared generalisations often used to describe whole groups

Slow to change
Ony change in response to wider social, political or economic changes
Aquired at an early age
Become stronger and more hostile when there is social tension

16

What is the accentuation principle of catergorising people?

We place people in catergories to accentuate certain traits

17

What is the stereotype content model?

The content of stereotypes reflects the social-structural relations between groups

(Eg: Old people having high warmth but low compentancy)

18

When a group stereotype is high warmth and low compentancy, what emotions do we associate with them?

Pity and sympathy

19

When a group stereotype is high warmth and high compentancy, what emotions do we associate with them?

Pride and admiration

20

When a group stereotype is low warmth and low compentancy, what emotions do we associate with them?

Contempt and disgust

21

When a group stereotype is low warmth and high compentancy, what emotions do we associate with them?

Envy and jealousy

22

How do stereotypes of old age affect old people?

Positive perceptions of age are shown to increase lifespan which shows that psychological state is important for our wellbeing

Bargh 1996: Measured how long it took to walk down a corridoor

23

What were the results of the 1996 Bargh study into old age?

When exposed to negative stereotypes of old age, they took longer to walk down a corridor

24

What is social encoding?

The process by which external stimuli are represented in the mind of the individual

25

What is the process of social encoding?

Pre-attentive analysis
Focal attention
Comprehension
Elaborative coding

26

What types of stimuli are there in social encoding?

Salient stimuli: Attention capturing and novel such as someone behaving oddly

Vivid stimuli: Emotionally attention grabbing and close to you in space and time such as a terrorist attack

Accessible stimuli: Accessibility of schemas we already have

27

What are accessible stimuli?

Accessibility of schemas we already have

28

What are vivid stimuli?

Emotionally attention grabbing and close to you in space and time such as a terrorist attack

29

What are salient stimuli

Attention capturing and novel such as someone behaving oddly

30

What are heuristics?

Time saving mental processes that reduce complex moral judgments to simple rules fo thumb