S6) Health-related Behaviour Flashcards Preview

(LUSUMA) Applied Social & Behavioural Healthcare Delivery Science I > S6) Health-related Behaviour > Flashcards

Flashcards in S6) Health-related Behaviour Deck (14)
Loading flashcards...
1

What are health-related behaviours?

Health-related behaviours are anything that may promote good health or lead to illness e.g. smoking, drinking, drug use, exercise, healthy diet, safe sex

2

Why is there a concern about health-related behaviour?

- At least 1/3 of all disease burden in the developed world is caused by tobacco, alcohol, BP, obesity and cholesterol

- Behaviour risk factors are responsible for 80% of CHD and cerebrovascular disease 

3

Identify 7 behaviours that promote longevity

- Sleep 7-8 hours a night

- Don’t smoke

- Eat breakfast 

- Near your “ideal” weight

- Don’t eat between meals

- Regular exercise

- Drink alcohol in moderation/not at all

4

Classical conditioning is a learning theory to help understand people’s health-related behaviour.

Outline it

Classical conditioning: behaviours can become linked to unrelated stimuli

E.g. behaviours such as smoking & drinking can become unconsciously paired with environment (work break) or emotions (anxiety)

 

5

Which aversive techniques can arise from classical conditioning?

- Pairing a behaviour with an unpleasant response 

E.g. Alcohol & medication to induce nausea (nausea is result of medication + alcohol but comes to be associated with alcohol)

- Break unconscious response – change habits

6

What are the limitations of conditioning theories?

No account of social context, cognitive processes, knowledge, beliefs, memory, attitudes, expectations etc.

7

Operant conditioning is a learning theory to help understand people’s health-related behaviour.

Outline it

Operant conditioning: behaviour is shaped by the consequences (reward or punishment)

- Behaviour increases if it is rewarded / a punishment is removed

- Behaviour decreases if it is punished / a reward is removed

8

What are the limitations of operant conditioning?

- Unhealthy behaviours immediately rewarding e.g. alcohol, smoking, chocolate, unsafe sex

- Driven by short term rewards

9

Social learning theory is a learning theory to help understand people’s health-related behaviour.

Outline it

Social learning theory: people can learn vicariously (observation/ modelling)

- We learn what behaviours are rewarded, and how likely it is we can perform behaviour, from observing others

10

What are the positives and negatives of social learning theory?

Negative: harmful behaviours will be modelled e.g. drinking, drug use, unsafe sex

Positive: peer modelling / education, celebrities in health promotion campaigns 

11

Cognitive dissonace theory is a social cognition model to help understand people’s health-related behaviour.

Outline it

Cognitive dissonance theory: discomfort when actions/events don’t match beliefs

- Either reduce discomfort by changing beliefs or behaviour

- Or provide health information which creates mental discomfort prompts behaviour changes

12

The theory of planned behaviour is a social cognition model to help understand people’s health-related behaviour.

Outline it

13

What are the limitations of the Theory of Planned Behaviour?

- Good predictor of intentions but poor predictor of behaviour

- Problem with translating intentions into behaviour

14

The stages of change model is a transtheoretical model to help understand people’s health-related behaviour.

Outline it

- Stages of change model – 5 stages which people may pass through over time in decision making / change

- The way people think about health behaviours, & willingness to change their behaviour, are not static