V: Special Considerations in Speech-Language Pathology Practice (AAC & Audiology) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in V: Special Considerations in Speech-Language Pathology Practice (AAC & Audiology) Deck (127)
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1

AAC

AAC (1)

forms of communication that either supplement and/or replace more conventional means of communication (typically referring to speech)

2

AAC

F2F (1)

face-to-face communication (refers to spoken communication)

3

AAC

developmental and congenital disorders associated with need for AAC (7)

autism spectrum disorders (ASD), cerebral palsy (CP), down syndrome, severe and refractory phonological disorders, childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), intellectual disability, spina bifida

4

AAC

acquired disorders associated with need for AAC (8)

brain tumor, stroke (cerebrovascular accident or CVA), spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), multiple sclerosis (MS), guillain-barre syndrome (muscle weakness caused by PNS damage), huntington's disease (HD), head and neck cancers (HNCs)

5

AAC

FAPE, 1975 (3)

free appropriate public education, guaranteed by rehabilitation act of 1973 and IDEA 1990, requires that children with disabilities receive support free of charge as is provided to nondisabled students

6

AAC

IDEA, 1990 (1)

individuals with disabilities education act, stipulates that assistive technology must be provided if it is required as a part of a child's special education, related services or supplementary aids and serviced

7

AAC

assistive technology act amendments of 2004 (2)

PL-108-364, mandated assistive technology centers in each state and territory

8

AAC

ADA (2)

americans with disabilities act, hospitals must provide effective means of communication for patients, family members and hospital visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing

9

AAC

unaided vs aided (1::1)*

use of only the body to communicate without external aids or equipment :: use of external equipment to assist with communication

*aided AAC devices may be: no, low, mid and/or high-tech

10

AAC

dedicated vs nondedicated devices

sole purpose is to assist with communication (typically face-to-face) by providing speech output :: commercially available and support a range of functions in addition to speech output

11

AAC

iconicity (2)

the association a person makes between a symbol and its referent, can be: opaque (symbol does not resemble referent), translucent (symbol resembles referent), transparent (symbol can be readily guesses)

12

AAC

static vs dynamic displays

display doesn't change :: screen changes following use input

13

AAC

cosmesis (1)

aesthetic appeal of a device and whether it can be modified/personalized (colors, designs)

14

AAC

direct selection vs alternate access

select via touch or other means (eye gaze) :: scan choices and the user indicates a choice using a predetermined signal

15

AAC

common scanning patterns (5)

circular (simplest type of scanning where icons highlight in a circle until a selection is made), linear (row-by-row, left to right), row-column, top-bottom, group item (icons grouped into themes)

16

AAC

selection control techniques (3)

direct (inverse) scanning (hold and release), automatic (regular) scanning (cursor moves automatically and a selection is made when switch is activated), step scanning (1:1 correspondence between cursor movement and switch activation)

17

AAC

partner-assisted scanning (1)

communication partner presents choices to the AAC use

18

AAC

auditory scanning (2)

used when visual interaction with the device is not possible, choices are provided auditorily

19

AAC

switches (3)

used with scanning to make selections, may use multiple switches to tailor functionality specific to the patient, types: mechanical, electrical, pneumatic (uses inhalation/exhalation to activate), electronic

20

AAC

switch site hierarchy (7)

hands -> head -> mouth -> feet -> lower extremities -> upper extremities -> mind

21

AAC

types of AAC communicators (4)

vary by skill while using device, types: emerging, contextual, independent

22

AAC

four main reasons for communicative interaction

communication of wants/needs, information transfer, social closeness, social etiquette

23

AAC

four core competencies of communicative competence for AAC user

linguistic, operational (maintenance of device), social, strategic (compensatory strategies to circumvent limitations of device)

24

AAC

types of rate enhancement (3)

prediction (autocorrect), coding (alpha, alphanumeric, letter-category, numeric codes), message coding (alpha-letter encoding, abbreviation expansion, icon prediction, color coding)

25

AAC

organization strategies using types of displays (3)

grid displays (fitzgerald key system, schematic grid, pragmatic organization dynamic display or PODD), visual scene displays, alphabet displays (QWERTY, ABCD, vowels on the left and consonants following)

26

AAC

CCN (1)

complex communication needs

27

AAC

participation model (2)

a systematic approach on assessment and intervention focusing meeting participation requirements for routines and activities of typical peers, identifies barriers of opportunity and access

28

AAC

opportunity barriers (5)*

policy, practice, knowledge, skill, attitude

*these barriers are external

29

AAC

tangible symbol systems (2)

aka symbol assessment, used to determine: most abstract level of symbol representation that can be reliably used, smallest size symbol(s) that can be reliably used

30

AAC

feature matching (1)

the process by which the skills and needs of the client are matched against the features of various AAC systems (process to find the best/most fitting device for the individual)