Section 2 - Credibility Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Section 2 - Credibility Deck (99)
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1

What is a claim?

Statements that people make that it’s possible to question or disagree with.

2

Give some examples of claims.

• Reasons
• Conclusions

3

What is plausibility?

The likelihood of a certain outcome.

4

What makes a future event or outcome plausible?

If it’s likely to happen.

5

Is a plausible claim necessarily correct?

No - just because it seems likely, doesn’t mean it has to be true.

6

What makes a claim plausible?

If it’s reasonable.

7

Assess the plausibility:

“Tomorrow the Queen will break the triple-jump world record.”

Not plausible, because it’s unlikely that this will happen.

8

Assess the plausibility:

“Raising the speed limit will cause more car accidents.”

Plausible, because it’s likely that this will happen.

9

Assess the plausibility:

“Cabbage is healthier than chocolate.”

Plausible, because the claim is reasonable.

10

Assess the plausibility:

“100% or people prefer cabbage to chocolate.”

Not plausible, because the claim is not reasonable.

11

What is credibility?

How much a claim can be believed.

12

When you are asked to assess credibility of a claim or document, what are you actually assessing?

• The credibility of the writer or organisation that published it
• But you must still refer to the source in your answer!

13

Can a claim that is plausible and credible still be false?

Yes

14

What things might you be asked to assess the credibility of?

• Individual
• Organisation
• Document
• Claim

15

What types of credibility question might you get asked?

• Assessing the credibility of one source
• Comparing the relative credibility of two sources

16

How can you work out how credible a source is?

Using credibility criteria.

17

How many credibility criteria are there?

7

18

What are the credibility criteria?

• Corroboration / Consistency
• Reputation
• Ability to see or perceive
• Vested interest
• Bias
• Experience / Expertise
• Neutrality

19

What acronym can be used to remember the credibility criteria?

CRAVEN

20

What does CRAVEN stand for?

• Corroboration / Consistency
• Reputation
• Ability to see or perceive
• Vested interest / Bias
• Experience / Expertise
• Neutrality

21

What is bias?

Being prejudiced to one side of an argument.

22

Is bias intentional?

No always - it can be subconscious.

23

How does bias affect people?

It may make them prejudiced for or against a certain point of view.

24

Why might people be biased?

Because of background or experiences.

25

Give some examples of things that can cause people to be biased.

• Religious beliefs
• Past experience
• Family/Friends

26

How does bias affect credibility and why?

It usually decreases credibility because the bias could give them a motive to exaggerate, distort or lie.

27

What is an easy way to spot bias?

• Lack of a balanced argument
• Selective fact use

28

What is vested interest?

When a person or organisation has something to gain (or can avoid something negative) by an argument going their way.

29

How does vested interest affect credibility?

• Might decrease credibility -> By giving the source a reason to exaggerate, distort or lie.
• Might increase credibility -> If someone has a vested interest in telling the truth.

30

When might vested interest increase credibility?

• When the source has a vested interest in telling the truth.
• This is common when the source’s career or business depends on their reputation for impartiality and fairness.