Large-Vessel Clinical Syndromes Flashcards Preview

Cerebrovascular Disease > Large-Vessel Clinical Syndromes > Flashcards

Flashcards in Large-Vessel Clinical Syndromes Deck (28)
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1

Internal carotid artery

-Ipsilateral retinal ischemia (amaurosis) -Sensorimotor dysfunction similar to involvement of middle and anterior cerebral artery territories

2

Middle cerebral artery (M1)

-Contralateral face and arm > leg weakness -Aphasia (dominant hemisphere) -Contralateral sensory loss -Cortical sensory loss (nondominant hemisphere) -Contralateral visual field defect -Gaze deviation ipsilateral to lesion

3

Middle cerebral artery, anterior division

-Contralateral face and arm > leg weakness -Broca’s aphasia (dominant hemisphere)

4

Middle cerebral artery, posterior division

-Contralateral sensory loss -Wernicke’s aphasia (dominant hemisphere) -Gerstmann’s syndrome (dominant hemisphere) -Cortical sensory loss/neglect (nondominant hemisphere) -Contralateral visual field defect

5

Anterior cerebral artery

-Contralateral leg weakness -Contralateral leg sensory loss -Apraxia -Abulia (bilateral)

6

Anterior choroidal artery

-Contralateral homonymous hemianopia (lateral geniculate body) -Contralateral face, arm, leg weakness (posterior limb internal capsule) -Contralateral face, arm, leg sensory loss (thalamus)

7

Posterior cerebral artery (precommunicating)

-Contralateral sensory loss (thalamus) -Cognitive dysfunction (thalamus) -Thalamic aphasia (rarely) -Visual dysfunction as for postcommunicating segment

8

Posterior cerebral artery (postcommunicating segment)

-Contralateral homonymous hemianopia -Visual agnosias

9

Posterior inferior cerebellar artery

-Horner’s syndrome -Ipsilateral hemiataxia -Ipsilateral palatal weakness -Hoarse voice -Decreased pain and temperature on ipsilateral face and contralateral limbs

10

Anterior inferior cerebellar artery

-Ipsilateral deafness -Ipsilaeral facial weakness (lower motor neuron) -Ipsilateral hemiataxia -Contralateral sensory loss in limbs

11

Superior cerebellar artery

-Ipsilateral ataxia -Decreased sensation contralaterally -Diplopia

12

Basilar perforators, median and paramedian pontine perforators

-Contralateral limb weakness if unilateral or quadriparesis if bilateral -Hemiataxia may develop (crossing pontocerebellar fibers) -Cranial nerve/nuclear VI and VII palsies Internuclear ophthalmoplegia

13

Midbrain basilar, posterior cerebral artery perforators

-Ipsilateral nuclear or fascicular cranial nerve III palsy -Contralateral face, arm, leg weaknes (corticospinal tracts) -Rubral tremor (red nucleus) may develop -Ataxia (decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle) may occur

14

Anterior spinal and vertebral perforators to median and paramedian medulla

-Ipsilateral tongue weakness (cranial nerve/nucleus XII) -Contralateral arm and leg have reduced vibration sensation and proprioception (medial lemniscus) -Contralateral arm and leg weakness (medullary pyramids)

15

-Ipsilateral retinal ischemia (amaurosis) -Sensorimotor dysfunction similar to involvement of middle and anterior cerebral artery territories

Internal carotid artery

16

-Contralateral face and arm > leg weakness -Aphasia (dominant hemisphere) -Contralateral sensory loss -Cortical sensory loss (nondominant hemisphere) -Contralateral visual field defect -Gaze deviation ipsilateral to lesion

Middle cerebral artery (M1)

17

-Contralateral face and arm > leg weakness -Broca’s aphasia (dominant hemisphere)

Middle cerebral artery, anterior division

18

-Contralateral sensory loss -Wernicke’s aphasia (dominant hemisphere) -Gerstmann’s syndrome (dominant hemisphere) -Cortical sensory loss/neglect (nondominant hemisphere) -Contralateral visual field defect

Middle cerebral artery, posterior division

19

-Contralateral leg weakness -Contralateral leg sensory loss -Apraxia -Abulia (bilateral)

Anterior cerebral artery

20

-Contralateral homonymous hemianopia (lateral geniculate body) -Contralateral face, arm, leg weakness (posterior limb internal capsule) -Contralateral face, arm, leg sensory loss (thalamus)

Anterior choroidal artery

21

-Contralateral sensory loss (thalamus) -Cognitive dysfunction (thalamus) -Thalamic aphasia (rarely) -Visual dysfunction as for postcommunicating segment

Posterior cerebral artery (precommunicating)

22

-Contralateral homonymous hemianopia -Visual agnosias

Posterior cerebral artery (postcommunicating segment)

23

-Horner’s syndrome -Ipsilateral hemiataxia -Ipsilateral palatal weakness -Hoarse voice -Decreased pain and temperature on ipsilateral face and contralateral limbs

Posterior inferior cerebellar artery

24

-Ipsilateral deafness -Ipsilaeral facial weakness (lower motor neuron) -Ipsilateral hemiataxia -Contralateral sensory loss in limbs

Anterior inferior cerebellar artery

25

-Ipsilateral ataxia -Decreased sensation contralaterally -Diplopia

Superior cerebellar artery

26

-Contralateral limb weakness if unilateral or quadriparesis if bilateral -Hemiataxia may develop (crossing pontocerebellar fibers) -Cranial nerve/nuclear VI and VII palsies Internuclear ophthalmoplegia

Basilar perforators, median and paramedian pontine perforators

27

-Ipsilateral nuclear or fascicular cranial nerve III palsy -Contralateral face, arm, leg weaknes (corticospinal tracts) -Rubral tremor (red nucleus) may develop -Ataxia (decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle) may occur

Midbrain basilar, posterior cerebral artery perforators

28

-Ipsilateral tongue weakness (cranial nerve/nucleus XII) -Contralateral arm and leg have reduced vibration sensation and proprioception (medial lemniscus) -Contralateral arm and leg weakness (medullary pyramids)

Anterior spinal and vertebral perforators to median and paramedian medulla