Functional Bowel Disorders Flashcards Preview

07. Year 2: Alimentary System > Functional Bowel Disorders > Flashcards

Flashcards in Functional Bowel Disorders Deck (69)
Loading flashcards...
1

What are the 2 broad categories of GI disease?

Structural

Functional

2

What is the difference between structural and functional GI disease?

Structural has detectable pathology whereas functional does not

3

What are examples of functional GI disorders?

Oesophageal spasm

Non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD)

Biliary dyskinesia

Irritable bowel syndrome

Slow transit constipation

Drug related effects

4

What does NUD stand for?

Non-ulcer dyspepsia

5

What do functional GI disorders have a large impact on?

Quality of life

Psychological factors

6

What are functional GI disorders not associated with that structural disorders are?

Serious pathology

7

What is non-ulcer dyspepsia?

Chronic or recurrent abdominal pain or nausea, without an ulcer

8

What is the helicobacter pylori status of non-ulcer dyspepsia?

It varies

9

What diseases i non-ulcer dyspepsia probably a combination of?

Reflux

Low grade duodenal ulceration

Delayed gastric emptying

Irritable bowel syndrome

10

What does the diagnosis of non-ulcer dyspepsia involve?

Careful history and examination  - FH is important

H Pylori status

Alarm symptoms

If in doubt, endoscopy

11

What therapy is required for non-ulcer dyspepsia when H Pylori is positive?

Eradication therapy

12

What is nausea?

The sensation of feeling sick

13

What is retching?

Dry heaves (antrum contracts, glottis closed)

14

What is vomiting?

Abdominal contents expelled

15

What is often found in the history of nausea and vomiting immediately, 1 hour or more, 12 hours?

Immediate cause is psychogenic

1 hour or more is due to pyloric obstruction or motility disorders (diabetes, post gastrectomy)

12 hours or more is obstruction

16

What are some functional causes of nausea and vomiting?

Drugs

Pregnancy

Migraine

Cyclical vomiting syndrome

Alcohol

17

What is psychogenic vomiting?

Vomiting without any obvious organ pathology or with a psychological aetiology

18

Who often suffers from psychogenic vomiting?

Young woman

19

What often happens to psychogenic vomiting after admission?

It stops

20

What is irritable bowel syndrome?

Condition of the digestive system that can cause crampls, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation

21

What is slow transit constipation?

Reduced motility of the large intestine caused by abnormalities of the enteric nerves

22

How does bowel habit from person to person vary?

There is a great variation in both bowel habit and stool weight

23

What is the average stool weight in the UK?

100-200g/day

24

What should be known about the interpretation of the word constipation?

It means different things to different people, so a better approach is to ask the patient about changes in the frequency, consistency, presence of blood or mucus from there normal

25

What are alarm symptoms relating to constipation?

Age >50 years

Short symptoms history

Unintentional weight loss

Nocturnal symptoms

Male sex

Family history of bowel/ovarian cancer

Anaemia

Rectal bleeding

Recent antibiotic use

Abdominal mass

26

What investigations should be done for slow transit constipation?

Colonoscopy

FBC

Blood glucose

U + E

Thyroid status

Coeliac serology

FIT testing

Sigmoidoscopy

27

What are different categories of the aetiology of constipation?

Systemic

Neurogenic

Organic

Functional

28

What are examples of systemic causes of constipation?

Diabetes mellitus

Hypothyroidism

Hypercalcaemia

29

What are examples of neurogenic causes of constipation?

Autonomic neuropathies

Parkinson disease

Strokes

Multiple sclerosis

Spina bifida

30

What are examples of organic causes of constipation?

Strictures

Tumours

Diverticular diseases

Proctisis

Anal fissure