Alimentary Pharmacology Flashcards Preview

07. Year 2: Alimentary System > Alimentary Pharmacology > Flashcards

Flashcards in Alimentary Pharmacology Deck (88)
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1

What are different categories of drugs for alimentary disease?

Acid suppression

Drugs affecting GI motility

Laxatives

Drugs for inflammatory bowel disease

Drugs affecting intestinal secretions

2

What are examples of drugs for acid suppression?

Antacids

Alginates

H2 receptor antagonists

Proton pump inhibitors

3

What are examples of drugs affecting GI motility?

Anti-emetics

Anti-muscurinics/anti-spasmodics

Anti-motility

4

What are examples of drugs for IBD?

Aminosalicylates

Corticosteroids

Immunosteroids

Biologics

5

What are examples of drugs affecting intestinal secretions?

Bile acid sequestrants

Ursadeoxycholic acid

6

What do antacids contain?

Magnesium or aluminium

7

What do antacids do?

Neutralise gastric acid

8

When are antacids taken?

When symptoms occur

9

What is an example of an alginate?

Gaviscon

10

What is an alginate?

Form of viscous gel that floats on stomach contents and reduces influx

11

How do H2 receptor antagonists work?

Block histamine receptor therby reducing acid secretion

12

How are H2 receptor antagonists administered?

Orally or IV

13

What is an example of a H2 receptor antagonist?

Ranitidine

14

What is an example of a proton pump inhibitor?

Omeprazole

15

When are H2 receptor antagonists indicated?

GORD

Peptic ulcer disease

16

How do proton pump inhibitors work?

Block proton pump and therby reduce acid secretion

17

When are proton pump inhibitors indicated?

GORD

Peptic ulcer disease

18

How are proton pump inhibitors administered?

Oral or IV

19

What are side effects of proton pump inhibitors?

GI upset

Predisposition to C. Difficile infection

Hypomagnesaemia

B12 deficiency

20

What do prokinetic agents do?

Increase gut motility and gastric emptying

21

What are examples of prokinetics?

Anti-emetics such as Metoclopramide and Domperidone

22

What is the mechanism of action of prokinetic agents?

Not clear but involves parasympathetic nervous sytem control of smooth muscle and sphincter tone (via acetylcholine)

23

What is the mechanism of action for Domperidone?

Blocks dopamine receptors which inhibit post-synaptic cholinergic neurones

24

What is the physiology behind vomiting?

25

What different things can be targeted to prevent vomiting?

Chemoreceptor trigger zone

Pharynx and GIT

Vestibular neclei

Cerebral cortex

26

What is a possible side effect of drugs that decrease motility?

Constipation

27

What are examples of drugs that decrease motility?

Loperamide

Opiods

28

What is the clinical benefit of drugs that reduce motility?

Anti-diarrhoea

29

What is the mechanism of action of drugs that decrease motility?

Decrease smooth muscle contraction, increase anal sphincter tone

30

What are anti-spasmodics used for?

Reduce symptoms due to IBS or renal colic