Unit 3 - Lower Airway Disease and Pneumonia Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Unit 3 - Lower Airway Disease and Pneumonia Deck (60)
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1

Why is inflammatory disease in cats identified as 'feline lower airway disease'?

Because it is difficult to distinguish between bronchitis and asthma in cats so it is all just lumped together

2

What inflammatory airway disease happens in dogs?

chronic bronchitis

3

What is airflow limitation?

Impedance to air movement in the airways caused by inflammation, secretions, and smooth muscle contraction

4

Characterize spontaneous bronchoconstriction in chronic bronchitis.

little to no spontaneous bronchoconstriction

5

Characterize spontaneous bronchoconstriction in feline asthma.

reversible spontaneous bronchoconstriction

6

What is the signalment for canine chronic bronchitis?

middle-aged to older, small breeds over-represented

7

What is the signalment for feline asthma and bronchitis?

young to middle-aged adult, siamese is common

8

What clinical signs are associated with inflammatory airway disease?

chronic cough, expiratory wheezes, and tachypnea at rest

9

If a patient with one of the inflammatory airway diseases were dyspneic, what kind of dyspnea pattern would you most likely see?

restrictive

10

What contributes to airflow limitation on expiration?

Positive thoracic pressures and airway inflammation contribute to airflow limitation

11

What diagnostics are important for inflammatory airway disease?

CBC, parasite testing, rads (bronchial lung pattern), and TTW, ETW, or BAL (

12

What parasite can cause 'feline lower airway disease'?

Aleurostrongylus abstrusus

13

How do cats get Aleurostrongylus and where do they live?

They ingest L3 larva and adult worms live in terminal bronchioles/alveolar ducts

14

How is Aleurostrongylus diagnosed?

L1 larvae is ID'd in the airway fluid or feces

15

How is Aleurostrongylus treated?

mild cases are self-limiting; fenbendazole

16

What are the classic signs of feline asthma radiographically?

broncho-intersitial lung pattern, pulmonary hyperinflation, and atelectasis of the right middle lung lobe due to mucus plugging

17

What will you find on bronchoscopy in feline asthma patients?

hyperemia, irregularity, increased mucus, and lower airway collapse

18

How will the respiratory wash cytology look in cats with bronchitis?

neutrophilic

19

How will the respiratory wash cytology look in cats with asthma?

eosinophilic

20

What is the treatment for lower airway disease?

corticosteroids (tx of choice), bronchodilators (don't effect inflammation), and +/- cough suppressants (dogs)

21

What drugs can be used for inhaled therapy of lower airway disease?

fluticasone, albuterol, and others

22

What are some other treatments for lower airway disease?

weight loss, harness versus collar, and environmental trigger avoidance

23

What are the treatment goals for lower airway disease?

minimize clinical signs and slow airway remodeling

24

What type of lower airway disease is eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy?

Interstitial disease

25

What is eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy?

interstitial lung disease characterized by infiltration with eosinophils

26

Most cases of eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy are _______.

iodiopathic

27

What is the signalment for eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy?

young dogs, arctic breeds and rottweilers predisposed

28

Before diagnosing for eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy, what must you rule out first?

parasites and neoplasia

29

What does eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy respond well to?

corticosteroids

30

What type of lower airway disease is idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?

interstitial disease

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