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Flashcards in Test two Deck (51)
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1

Number of Thoracic Vertebrae

12

2

At the end of the vertebrae. Made up of five fused bones.

Sacrum

3

Bones in the hand

Metacarpals

4

Bones in the feet

Metatarsals

5

The spinal cord passes through the _____ from the brain to the vertebral column.

Foramen Magnum

6

Average number of bones in the adult human body.

206

7

Average number of bones in an infants body

over 400

8

Longest and heaviest bone in the human body

Femer

9

the ordering of organisms into categories, such as orders, families, and genera, to show evolutionary relationships.

Classification

10

The phylum of the animal kingdom that includes vertebrates.

Chordata

11

Similarities between organisms based strictly on common function, with no assumed common evolutionary descent.

analogies

12

similarities between organisms based on decent from a common ancestor.

Homologies

13

Continental drift

Pangea during Paleozoic
North Half - Laurasia, South Half Gondwanaland. During Mesozoic
North America, South America, Antarctica, Australia, Madagascar, India, Africa, Eurasia

14

A type (subclass) of mammal. During the Cenozoic, placentals become the most widespread and numerous mammals and today are represented by upward of 20 orders, including the primates.

Placental

15

Egg-laying mammals

Monotremes

16

Pouched mammas

Marsupials

17

The relatively rapid expansion and diversification of life-forms into new ecological niches.

adaptive radiation

18

All primates see in color

and have a longer life spans

19

An organism's entire way of life: where it lives, what it eats, how it gets food, how it avoids predators, and so on.

Adaptive Niche

20

Lemurs

The only primates, only found on Madagascar and adjacent islands of the east cost of Africa. Approximately 60 species.
Range in sizes from 5 inches to 2-3 feet
Big ones are diurnal and eat leaves, fruits, buds, bark and shoots
Small ones are nocturnal and are insectivorous
Mostly arboreal, some like ringtail are terrestrial.
Some live in groups from 10-25 of both sexes and ages, families or solitary.

21

Tarsiers

Five species only on the islands of South Asia.
Habitat range from tropical forest to backyard gardens.
Nocturnal insectivores live on lower branches.
Mated Pair and offspring
More closely related to lemurs and lorises.
Large immobile eyes
rotate head 180 degrees

22

New World Monkeys

70 species in wide
range of environments from South Mexico to Central and south America
Range in size, diet and adaptations.
12 ounces to 20 lbs
Most are arboreal one is diurnal
Two species have claws and give birth to twins.
Social groups with either mated pair or two males and one females with offspring.
Marmosets and tamarins males extensively involved in infant care.
Fruits, leaves and insects
Most quadrupedal few semibrachiators
prehensile tails

23

Old World Monkeys

Most widely distributed
Sub-Saharra Africa and southern Asia from tropical jungles to semiarid desert and snow-covered areas in north Japan
taxonomic family Cerocpithecidae
subfamilies cercopithecines and colobines
Most are arboreal some spend a lot of time on land but go to trees at night
Hardened skin on buttocks called ischial callosities
Cercopithecine more omnivorous
Colobine leaf eaters, small groups
Sexual dimorphism

24

Strepsirhini

The primate suborder that includes lemurs and lorises

25

Haplorhini

the primate suborder that includes tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans.

26

Hominoids

Members of the primate superfamily (Hominoidea) that includes apes and humans

27

Sexual dimorphism

Differences in physical characteristics between males and females of the same species.

28

Estrus

Period of sexual receptivity in nonhuman female mammals correlated with ovulation.

29

4 groups of Apes

Gorillas, chimpanzees, Gibbons, Orangoutangs

30

Which ape is solitary

Orangutan