Subtest I - Literary Devices Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Subtest I - Literary Devices Deck (19)
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1

Anachronism

A detail of a literary work that is not appropriate for its time setting. For example, having a woman in Victorian England make a call on a cell phone would be an anachronism.

2

Analogy

When a writer emphasizes the ways two apparently unlike things are actually similar.

3

Antithesis

A figure of speech that balances an idea with a contrasting one or its opposite. From Robert Frost: "Some say the world will end in fire,/Some say in ice."

4

Assonance

The repetition of vowel sounds in a sentence or line of poetry.

5

Connotation

The use of precise words to give a positive or negative slant to a statement or passage. For example the word fragrance has a positive connotation; stench has a negative one. Both words mean "smell"

6

Denotation

The literal meaning of a word, as found in a dictionary, (Think definition)

7

Diction

The choice of words and style of language used through which the writer creates the tone of a work.

8

Enjambment

The continuation of a clause or sentence from one line of poetry to the next. Poets may use enjambment to subvert the reader's expectations about what the lines are saying. Enjambment can also create a faster pace or a change of rhythm.

9

Epigraph

A quotation from another source that appears at the beginning of a literary work and suggests its theme.

10

Heroic couplets

A form of English poetry with pairs of rhyming lines in iambic pentameter (five stresses to a line).

11

Verbal irony

Saying one thing and meaning something else.

12

Situational irony

When a situation is in reality much different than the character or characters think.

13

Dramatic irony

When the audience is aware of something that the characters onstage (or in a story) do not know.

14

Malapropism

A word mistaken for another word with a similar sound.

15

Meter

A way of measuring the rhythm in formal verse. Meter is shown by dividing a line of verse into feet, or units of two or three syllables.

16

Metonymy

A figure of speech in which a word is substituted for another word with which it is somehow linked or closely associated. Ex: "The pen is mightier than the sword" means that the power of writing or literature is greater than military force.

17

Oxymoron

A phrase made up of words that seem contradictory "passive aggressive" and "deafening silence".

18

Refrain

A line or phrase that is repeated at regular intervals in a poem, usually at the end of a stanza.

19

Synecdoche

A figure of speech in which a part stands for the whole, as in referring to an old mans as
graybeard".