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Flashcards in Quiz Calculus Removal Instruments Deck (22)
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1

Describe how a calculus deposit is removed from a tooth surface to prevent burnishing.

Stabilization: Apply pressure with the index finger and thumb inward against the instrument handle and press the tip of the fulcrum against the tooth surface
Adaptation: Tip-third of cutting edge is adapted
Angulation: 70-80 degree for sickle scalers , the lower shank must be tilted slightly toward the tooth surface to achieve correct angulation
Lateral pressure for calculus removal: Moderate to firm pressure against tooth surface is maintained during short controlled calculus removal stroke mad away from soft tissue
Characteristics: Controlled stroke, short in length
Stroke Direction: vertical horizontal or oblique
stroke number: use minium number of strokes needed to remove calculus deposits

2

A calculus deposit that has had the outermost layer removed. Burnished calculus is difficult to remove because the cutting edge will tend to slip over the smooth surface of the deposit

Burned Deposit

3

A series of imaginary narrow tracts on the root surface used to assist the clinician in systematically removing calculus deposits from subgingival root surfaces. Each instrumentation zone is only as wide as the toe-third of the instrument's cutting edge

instrumentation zones

4

Instrumentation strokes that are parallel to the long axis of the tooth; used on the mesial and distal surfaces of posterior teeth

Vertical strokes

5

Instrumentation strokes that are diagonal to the long axis of the tooth; used most commonly on facial and lingual surfaces

Oblique Strokes

6

Instrumentation strokes that are perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth used (1) at the line angles of posterior teeth (2) in furcation areas, and (3) within pockets that are too narrow vertical or oblique strokes

Horizontal Strokes

7

The relationship between the face of a calculus removal instrument and the tooth surface to which it is applied. for insertion beneath the gingival margin, the face to tooth surface angulation should be an angle between 0 degrees and 40 degrees. For calculus removal, the face to tooth surface angulation should be an angel between 45 and 90 degrees

Angulation

8

The action of moving the working end beneath the gingival margin into the sulcus or pocket. Curets are the primary calculus removal instruments for subgingival instrumentation. The working end is inserted at an angle between 0 to 40 degrees

Insertion

9

Angulation of the working end at an angle between 0 degrees and 40 for insertion beneath the gingival margin into the sulcus or pocket

Closed angle

10

A periodontal instrument used to remove calculus deposits from the crowns of the teeth. Its working end has a pointed back and pointed tip and is triangular in cross section. Sickle scalers are available in anterior or posterior

sickle scaler

11

used to instrument the distal surfaces
closest to handle

Inner cutting edge

12

used to instrument the facial, lingual and mesial surfaces

Lower/outer cutting edge

13

commonly used on anterior teeth and mesial and distal of posterior

vertical strokes

14

Facial and lingual surfes of posterior teeth

oblique strokes

15

Line angles of post. teeth and midlines of facial or lingual anterior

horizontal strokes

16

Identify and describe design characteristic of universal curets and sickle scalers and the advantages and limitations of each.

Pictures Notability

17

Primary usage/function of Area-Specific Curet

-Instrumentation of crown and root surfaces.
-Remove light calculus deposits and for deplaquing rigid gracey curets can remove medium size deposits

18

Primary usage/function of a Universal Curet

- Instrumentation of crown and root surfaces
- Removal of small to medium size calculus deposits

19

Primary usage/function of a Universal Curet

- Instrumentation of crown and root surfaces
- Removal of small to medium size calculus deposits

20

Primary usage/function of a Sickle Scaler

Debridement of enamel surfaces. Not recommended for use on root surfaces

Removal of medium-to large sized calculus deposits

Excellent for calculus, removal on the (1) proximal surfaces of anterior crowns and (2) enamel surfaces apical to the contact areas of posterior teeth

21

Explain why the lower shank of a universal curet and sickle scaler should be tilted slightly toward the tooth surface being instrumented to obtain correct angulation.

The face of a sickle scaler and universal curet is at a 90 degree angle to the lower shank. The cutting edges are level. You must tilt 70-80 degrees to achieve correct angulation

22

Explain why the lower shank of an area specific curet should not be tilted slightly toward the tooth surface being instrumented to obtain correct angulation.

Face tilts at approx. 70 degree angle to the lower shank, one cutting edge is lower than the other in relation to the lower shank. Tilted face means that the lower cutting edge is self angulated.

Lower cutting edge is automatically at the correct angulation when the lower shank is parallel to the tooth surface to be instrumented