Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology Flashcards Preview

Spring EPPP Practice > Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology > Flashcards

Flashcards in Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology Deck (94)
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1

Acetylcholine (ACh)

- Neurotransmitter
- causes muscles to contract
- Myasthenia Gravis - auto-immune disorder causing profound weakness in skeletal muscles

2

Tyramine interacts with MAOIs

Decreased Tyramine in a diet is essential when taking an MAOI in order to avoid a hypertensive crisis.

3

Elevated levels of dopamine in the __________ pathway of the brain are responsible for the reinforcing effects of alcohol, psychostimulants, and opiates.

Mesolimbic Pathways

4

There’s evidence that, for some patients, depressive symptoms can be alleviated by either a placebo or an antidepressant and that a placebo and antidepressants affect the same area of the brain. More specifically, the research has found that:

A placebo produces increased activity in the prefrontal cortex while antidepressants produce decreased activity.

5

What do drugs that block the activity of ACh do?

Produce dry mouth, blurred vision, tachycardia, sedation, and hypotension

6

Who is at the highest risk for a migraine headache?

35 year-old female perfectionist and ambitious

7

Migraine symptoms

Does not begin with an aura and may be exacerbated by bending over or lifting

8

Tumor in medial hypothalamus would likely cause what changes?

Outbursts of aggressive behavior

9

Describe depression in people with Parkinsons

Appears to be endogenous to the disorder and may precede motor symptoms, especially in younger patients.

10

If a young child (ie: 1 year old) sustains brain damage to the left hemisphere at Broca's Area, what will the outcome most likely be?

The child will likely ultimately eventually exhibit language abilities in the low to normal range, as the other brain hemisphere due to a take-over of language functions by the right hemisphere.

11

Serial Position Effect

- The tendency for a person to recall the first and last bits of information best and the middle items worst.
- Can be best explained by the 3-Boxes Model (multi-store) of Memory

12

When compare to patients with a TBI, volunteers instructed to malinger (fake brain injury) are:

Less likely to exhibit a recency effect.

13

What is Tardive Dyskinesia due to?

-TARDIVE DYSKENESIA and DOPAMINE are connected
- Tardive dyskenesia can be caused by dopamine blockers
- TDs are most common in patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder who have been treated with antipsychotic medication for long periods (but they occasionally occur in other patients as well.
- Could be treated with drugs that increase dopamine levels

14

For patients who develop Tardive Dyskinesia as a result of neuroleptic use, what are outcomes

- Symptoms may eventually improve to some degree following neuroleptic withdrawal.

15

Drugs that are given for alleviating psychotic symptoms such as those that accompany Schizophrenia or Psychotic Disorder

- Risperdal (less likely to produce Tardive Dyskenesia than traditional neuroleptics)
- Zyprexa
- Thorazine
not prescribed: Tegretol

16

Metobolic Encephalopathy - condition

- Can cause delirium
- May be caused by kidney or liver failure, diabetes, hypo or hyper thyroidism, vitamin deficiency, severe dehydration

17

Post-central gyrus of brain

- Sense of touch

18

Pre-central gyrus of brain

- Movement

19

Anterior Cingulate Cortex

Emotional reactions to pain

20

Central Acromatopsia

Cannot distinguish between hues. Due to bilateral lesions in the occipito-temporal region

21

What is the prognosis for those with a minor brain injury?

50% have post-concussion syndrome; most will recover completely within 3-6 months. If symptoms are still present after 1 year, they may be permanent.

22

Sleep disturbance in Depression has shown what about sleep cycle patterns?

Decreased latency and increased density of REM sleep

23

Describe Physiological mechanisms of eye blinking

Potentiated when viewing UNpleasant stimulus, and INHIBITED when viewing pleasant stimulus

24

A child suddenly has severe behavior problems after no history and no trauma. What could be happening?

Tumor pushing on various parts of the brain.

25

What are the most common symptom of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome?

Muscle rigidity, hyperthermia (hot) and stupor

26

What setting has been found to be the most likely to prescribe central nervous system medications?

Primary care clinics

27

Where does tactile sensation and visiospacial functions mediated in the brain?

The parietal lobe

28

Hydrocephalus

Problems with ventricles

29

What does the medication phenothiazine help?

Hallucinations

30

Anomia: Describes what?

-Inability to recall the names of familiar objects, attributes, or actions