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Flashcards in Neuro - Peripheral Nerve Diseases Deck (31)
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1

What degenerative diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

neuropathies and myopathies

2

What metabolic diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

diabetic neuropathies and polymyopathies

3

What neoplastic diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

nerve sheath tumors

4

What infectious diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

botulism, tetanus, and toxoplasmosis/neosporosis

5

What non-infectious diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

myasthenia gravis, coonhound paralysis, brachial plexus neuritis, polymyositis, masseter muscle myositis

6

What idiopathic diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

laryngeal paralysis, myotonia, neuropathies, motor neuronopathies, scotty cramp, familiar myoclonus of Labrador retreivers, dancing doberman syndrome, and dysatonia

7

What traumatic diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

brachial plexus avulsion

8

What toxic diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

tick paralysis and organophosphate toxicity

9

What vascular diseases affect the peripheral nervous system?

aortic thromboembolism

10

What are the big three diffuse lower motor neuron diseases?

botulism, coonhound paralysis (polyradiculoneuritis), and tick paralysis

11

What does botulism toxin due to the nervous system?

It prevents the release of ACH

12

What cranial nerve signs are associated with Botulism?

dysphagia, dysphonia, and megaesophagus

13

What does the toxin in patients with tick paralysis do to the nervous system?

It prevents the release of ACH

14

Where are the diffuse LMN signs associated with tick paralysis typically seen first?

In the pelvic limbs, then they progress to the thoracic limbs

15

What cranial nerve signs are associated with tick paralysis?

The cranial nerves are typically normal but there is occasionally mild facial muscle weakness reported and decreased palpebral

16

What is Coonhound paralysis (polyradiculoneuritis)?

immune mediated, inflammatory disease of the nerve roots (proximal nerves)

17

Where are the diffuse LMN signs associated with Coonhound paralysis initially noted?

the pelvic limbs

18

What cranial nerve signs are associated with Coonhound paralysis?

The cranial nerves are typically normal but there is occasionally mild facial muscle weakness reported and decreased palpebral

19

What clinical finding distinguishes Coonhound paralysis from tick paralysis and botulism?

dogs are often hyperesthetic to minimal stimulation

20

What are the 2 clinical forms of myasthenia gravis?

focal and diffuse

21

What disease process is associated with focal myasthenia gravis?

megaesophagus

22

What are the 2 clinical causes of myasthenia gravis?

congenital vs. acquired

23

What breeds commonly get congenital mysathenia gravis?

Jack Russell Terriers, Smooth-coated Fox terrier, Springer Spaniels, and Samoyed breeds

24

Generally, what is myasthenia gravis?

grave muscle weakness

25

What clinical signs are associated with myasthenia gravis?

classically exercise induced muscle weakness

26

How do myasthenia gravis patients step and how is their gait?

step distance is short and the gait is progressively stiff and stilted

27

What cranial nerve reflex is decreased in patients with myasthenia gravis?

decreased palpebral reflex

28

How is myasthenia gravis diagnosed?

clinical signs, tensilon response test, AntiACH receptor antibody test, and biopsy of the intercostal muscle

29

What is neuropraxia?

physiologic disruption of function without anatomical damage

30

What is axonotmesis?

anatomical disruption of some axons

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