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Flashcards in Main Muscle Groups (Little Blue Book) Deck (59)
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1

The most significant muscles of the head.

  • Insert into the skin or other muscles instead of bone.

Mucles of Facial Expression

2

Draws the corners of the mouth outward and upward, has often been referred to as the "similing muscle."

Zygomaticus Major

3

Involved in puckering the lips, and is sometimes called the "kissing muscle."

Orbicularis Oris

4

Helps puff the cheeks out and has consequently been called the "trumpters muscle."

Buccinator Muscle

5

Helps raise the eyebrows.

Frontalis

6

Draws the corners of the mouth laterally as in tension, or "false smiling."

Risorius

7

Pulls the lower lip down and back, as in a look of horror.

Platysma

8

  • Zygomaticus Major
  • Orbicularis Oris
  • Buccinator
  • Frontalis
  • Risorius
  • Platysma

Muscles of Facial Expression

9

Have to do with chewing or grinding food.

  • Temporalis
  • Masseter
  • Internal (medial) pterygoid
  • External (lateral) pteygoid

Muscles of Mastication

10

Named because it is attached to the temporal bone.

Temporalis

11

Comes from the Greek for "chewer."

Masseter

12

Named for one of their attachments, which is the wing-shaped portion of the sphenoid bone.

Internal and External Pteygoid Muscles

13

The top of the head is covered by a combination of two muscles plus a tendonous sheet of tissue over the top of the cranium.

  • Frontalis
  • Occipital
  • Galea aponeurotica

Occipitofontalis (Epicranius)

14

This term is used to refer to any broad, flat tendon in the body.

Aponeurosis

15

An important muscle of the neck area. Important for its action of moving the head and for the fact that the distance between the lateral margins of the two of these muscles marks the widest part of the neck.

Sternocleidomastoideus

16

Located on the front of the neck region. It outlines the vicinity in which the common carotid artery and the internal jugular vein are located.

Anterior Cervical Triangle

17

The medline of the neck.

Medial Boundary of The Anterior Cervical Triangle

18

The inferior margin of the mandible.

Superior Boundary of The Anterior Cervical Triangle

19

The anterior border of the sternocleidomastoideus.

Lateral Boundary of The Anterior Cervical Triangle

20

  • Pectoralis Major
  • Internal and External Intercostals
  • Phrenic Muscle (Diaphragm)
  • Rectus Abdominus
  • External and Internal Oblique
  • Psoas Major
  • Trapezius
  • Latissimus Dorsi
  • Erector Spinae

Trunk Muscles

21

Located in the anterior chest area and is involved in moving the upper arm.

  • Comes from the Latin word for "breast"

Pectoralis Major

22

"Betwen the ribs." Important for their involvement in the expansion and contraction of the thoracic area which occurs during breathing.

Internal and External Intercostals

23

Extremely important in the breathing process. A dome-shaped sheet of muscle which forms the floor of the throacic cavity, or the roof of the abdominal cavity.

  • During Breathing: Flattens out and enlarges the size of the thoracic cavity, which helps draw air into the lungs.

Phrenic Muscle (Diaphragm)

24

  • Esophageal Orifice
  • Vena Caval Orifice
  • Aortic Orifice

Openings in the Diaphragm

25

The center of the diaphragm is composed of this sheet of tendon.

Central Tendon

26

These muscles tend to be arranged in several layers, with the muscle fibers of each layer running at different angles.

  • This makes for a strong, supportive structure to enclose and protect the abdominal organs.

Abdominal Muscles

27

Often categorized by their general location:

  • Anteromedial
  • Anterolateral
  • Posterior Abdomen

Abdominal Muscle Categories

28

One of the anteromedial muscles and runs from the sternum and rib cage straight down to the pubic bone.

Rectus Abdominus

29

Run at angles down the anterior lateral part of the abdomen, with the transverse muscles underneath them.

External and Internal Oblique

30

An important posterior abdominal muscle. Runs from the lumbar vertebrae down to the femur. Involved with moving the femur and serves as an anatomical guide along the medial border for the external iliac artery and vein.

Psoas Major

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