M 10.7 Applicable National & International Requirements Flashcards Preview

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M10.7 Applicable National and International Requirements

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M10.7 Applicable National and International Requirements

  • Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections
  • Airworthiness Directives
  • Service Bulletins
  • Manufacturer's Service Information
  • Modification and Repairs
  • Maintenance Documentation
  • Maintenance Manuals
  • MMEL / MEL and Dispatch Deviation Lists
  • Continuing Airworthiness
  • Minimum Equipment Requirements - Test Flights
  • ETOPS
  • All Weather Operations

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

  • What is Maintenance?

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

How is this Aircraft Maintenance Program structured?

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

A Check:

A Check

An A Check is performed approximately every 400-600 FH. It is usually performed in a hanger for a minimum of 10 hours. However, the actual occurrence of this check varies by aircraft type, the FC/FH since the last check. The occurrence can be delayed by the airline if certain predetermined conditions are met.

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

B Check:

B Check

This is performed approximately every 6-8 months, and is usually completed within 1-3 days at an airport hangar. A similar occurrence schedule applies to the B Check as to the A check. However , B checks are increasingly incorporated into successive A checks. i.e Check A-1 through A-10 complete all the B check items. 

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

C Check:

C Check

  • This is performed approximately every 20-24 months or a specific number of actual FH or as defined by the manufacturer. This maintenance check is much more extensive than a B Check, requiring a large majority of the aircraft's components to be inspected.
  • This check puts the aircraft out of service, and the aircraft must not leave the maintenance site until is completed. It also requires more space, therefore, usually carried out in a hangar at a maintenance base. The time needed to complete such a check is at least 1-2 weeks.

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

3C Check:

3C Check

Some authorities use a type of check, known as 3C Check or Intermediate Layover (IL), which typically includes light structural maintenance, including checks for corrosion, or on specific high load parts of the airframe. It may also be used as the opportunity for cabin upgrades ( new seats, IFE and carpeting) which would otherwise put the aircraft out of service for a significant time without the need for an inspection. As component reliability has improved, some MROs now spread the workload across several C Checks.

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

D Check:

D Check

  • The D Check, sometimes known as a "heavy maintenance visit" is the most comprehensive check for an airplane. This check occurs approximately every 6-10 years. It is a check that takes the entire airplane apart for inspection and overhaul, possibly even the pain may need to be completely removed for further inspection on the fuselage metal skin. Such a check can generally take up to 2 months to complete, depending on the aircraft and the amount of man power available. It also requires the most space of all maintenance checks, and as such must be performed at a suitable maintenance base. It is by far the most expensive check, going into the million dollar range.
  • Often, older aircraft being phased out of a particular airline's fleet are either stored or scrapped upon reached their next D Check, since its more cost effective.

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Maintenance Program, Maintenance Checks and Inspections

  • A transport aircraft operator...
  • The MPD ...
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  • A transport aircraft operator is responsible for his maintenance program and has to get it approved by his civil aviation authority. This program is derived from the maintenance program of the aircraft manufacturer which is the MPD (Maintenance Planning Document)
  • The MPD of the manufacturer is the synthesis of 3 different sources:
    • The MRB (Maintenance Review Board) principal process
    • The certification regulation of the aircraft type and its operational demands
    • The follow up of the aircraft operation and the feedback from experience which leads to additionally specific tasks to maintain the airworthiness of the aircraft.

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The creating of the most suitable maintenance program

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MSG 2 ; Process orientated approach

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MSG 2

  • Hard Time (HT) Failure Preventive Process

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MSG 2

  • On-Condition (OC) Failure Preventive Process

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MSG 2

  • Condition Monitoring (CM) Not a Failure Preventive Process

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MSG 3:

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MSG 3 ; Task orientated approach

  • Airframe Systems Tasks

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MSG 3 ; Task orientated approach

  • Structural Item Tasks

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MSG 3 ; Task orientated approach

  • Zonal Inspection Tasks

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Maintenance Intervals

 

  • Various maintenance checks defined in the MSG 3 Process are considered standard:
    • Transit Checks
    • 24/48 Hour Checks
    • Hourly Limit Checks
    • Operating Cycle Limit Checks
    • Letter Checks

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Maintaining Effectivity, Efficiency and Reliability of the Maintenance Program

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AD - Airworthiness Directives

 

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SB - Service Bulletins

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Manufacturer's Service Information

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Modification and Repairs

 

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Part 21 Subpart M - Repairs

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Maintenance Documentation

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Maintenance Manuals

  • Brief Overview of Manuals:

Brief Overview of Manuals:

  • Manuals are formal documentation which gives out valuable information which range from the way maintenance task can be carried out on an aircraft to how the aircraft can be flown to even the procedures to follow during certain situations.
  • Certain manuals are most frequently used during maintenance. It is an important fact to note that these manuals may vary from aircraft to aircraft. Therefore customization of these manuals is vital before use.

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Maintenance Manuals

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Issuance of a CRS

  • All maintenance work carried out must be documented and copies retained of all CRSs issued to maintain traceability. Detailed maintenance record copies must be retained for 3 years from date of release of aircraft or component. Records shall be retained in a safe environment with regard for fire, flood and theft. Computer backup discs and tapes shall be stored in different locations to the working disc/tapes to ensure at least one good copy will survive should there be fire/flood/theft.
  • To perform the maintenance, the operator must possess and make permanently available the aircraft manufacturer's approved maintenance data. These maintenance data will include the manuals specified and other documents such as ADs, SBs, Reliability Programs and more.
  • CRS is a criteria that is outlined in Part M.A.801