Lesson 16 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Lesson 16 Deck (65)
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1
Translate to French:

The teacher had (made) the students sing

L'instituteur a fait chanter les élèves

Recall the causative use of faire, which is formed by faire + an infinitive. If the direct object in a causative construction is a noun (les élèves in this case), it follows the infinitive.

2
Translate to French:

She had the car washed. She had it washed

Elle a fait laver la voiture. Elle l'a fait laver

If the direct object in a causative construction is an object pronoun (l' in this case), it precedes faire. Also note that the object of faire here is laver, so the past participle of faire does not agree with the preceding feminine direct object pronoun.

3
Translate to French:

Have the house built. Have it built

Faites construire la maison. Faites-la construire

Note the placement of the direct objects in these (affirmative) imperative causative constructions. When the direct object is a pronoun (as in the second sentence), it follows the verb (attached with a hyphen) but precedes the infinitive.

4
Translate to French:

He had the students sing the song. He had them sing it

Il a fait chanter la chanson par les élèves. Il la leur a fait chanter

Here, two pronouns are used with the causative faire. The students (those doing the action) are the indirect object, while the song being sung is the direct object. Note also that the past participle of faire is invariable when followed by an infinitive.

5
Translate to French:

I am having him clean it

Je le lui fais nettoyer

Two pronouns are used in this causative construction. Recall that le/la/les should come before lui/leur when two pronouns are used.

6
Translate to French:

She had the newspaper brought to her

Elle s'est fait apporter le journal

The reflexive causative indicates that the subject is having something done to or for himself/herself.

7
Translate to French:

You have your hair cut

Tu te fais couper les cheveux

Note the use of the reflexive se faire in this causative construction. Also recall how the definite article is used with body parts like cheveux.

8
Translate to French:

I let Marcel do his homework

Je laisse Marcel faire ses devoirs

Note how the infinitive can be used after the verb laisser. This is similar to how the infinitive is used with faire in causative constructions.

9
Translate to French:

Did you let Jean eat the dessert?

Est-ce que tu as laissé Jean manger le dessert?

10
Translate to French:

My parents let me play guitar

Mes parents me laissent jouer de la guitare

Note how the direct object pronoun me precedes the verb here.

11
Translate to French:

I let him do it

Je le laisse le faire

There are two object pronouns here. One of them precedes the verb, while the other, which is the object of the infinitive, precedes the infinitive. In other words, the second le here refers to "it," which is the object of the infinitive faire.

12
Translate to French:

We hear Paul singing

On entend chanter Paul

Just like laisser, verbs of perception can be followed by the infinitive. Verbs that can be used like this include: entendre, voir, sentir, regarder, and écouter.

13
Translate to French:

We saw Maxime reading his book

Nous avons vu Maxime lire son livre

In this verb of perception + infinitive construction, the noun livre (the object of the infinitive lire) comes after the infinitive.

14
Translate to French:

I see the girl eating. I see her eating

Je vois manger la fille. Je la vois manger

Note the placement of the direct object pronoun before the verb of perception.

15
Translate to French:

We heard Marie sing(ing) the song. We heard her sing(ing) the song

Nous avons entendu Marie chanter la chanson. Nous l'avons entendue chanter la chanson

Note how the feminine past participle agrees with the preceding feminine object pronoun l', which replaces Marie.

16
Translate to French:

They heard her singing

Ils l'ont entendue chanter

Note how the participle agrees with the preceding object pronoun, which refers to a woman singing. The woman performs the action expressed by the infinitive. In other words, she is the subject of the infinitive, which warrants participle agreement.

17
Translate to French:

They heard it (the song) sung

Ils l'ont entendu chanter

Here, the participle entendu does not agree with the preceding object pronoun, which refers to a song being sung. This is because the song is actually the object of the infinitive, chanter. Participle agreement could only occur if the song were the subject of the infinitive, which is not the case.

18
Translate to French:

We heard her sing(ing) the song. We heard her sing(ing) it

Nous l'avons entendue chanter la chanson. Nous l'avons entendue la chanter

Here, two object pronouns are used. The first (l') applies to the person singing, while the second (la) is the song being sung.

19
Translate to French:

After visiting Paris, he went to Grenoble

Après avoir visité Paris, il est allé à Grenoble

Note the past infinitive, which is formed by pairing the infinitive of either avoir or être with a past participle. The past infinitive is used for actions that happened before other actions. Both actions are performed by the same subject.

20
Translate to French:

Thank you for helping him

Merci de l'avoir aidé

In English, the more literal translation here would be "Thanks for having helped him," which is how we say it in French. Also note the object pronoun l', placed before the verb construction here.

21
Translate to French:

I'm sorry for having missed you at the airport

Je suis désolé de t'avoir manqué à l'aéroport

Note the use of de after désolé -- "sorry for." Also note the object pronoun t', which precedes the past participle construction.

22
Translate to French:

They're happy that they came

Ils sont contents d'être venus

Note how the past participle agrees with the subject, since the auxiliary verb is être. (A more direct English translation would have been "They're happy for having come.")

23
Translate to French:

You guys wanted to (have) finish(ed) by Saturday

Vous vouliez avoir terminé avant le samedi

Here, the past infinitive modifies the main verb, vouloir.

24
Translate to French:

Julie? After seeing her, we left

Julie? Après l'avoir vue, nous sommes partis

Note how the past participle vue agrees with its preceding feminine direct object.

25
Translate to French:

He regrets not coming/having come

Il regrette de ne pas être venu

Note the placement of negative adverbs in the past infinitive. Ne and pas do not surround the past infinitive; instead, they both precede it.

26
Translate to French:

Marie can no longer take care of her grandmother

Marie ne peut plus prendre soin de sa grand-mère

to take care of - prendre soin de. Note that an alternative is the reflexive construction s'occuper de.

27
Translate to French:

I dream of a day when cancer will be cured

Je rêve d'un jour où le cancer sera guéri

to cure - guérir. Note that "to cure someone of something" is guérir quelqu'un de quelque chose. Also note how is used instead of quand to refer to a moment in time.

28
Translate to French:

Sorry to bother you

Excusez-moi de vous déranger

to bother, to disturb - déranger

29
Translate to French:

I sneeze when I'm in the same room as a dog

J'éternue quand je suis dans la même pièce qu'un chien

to sneeze - éternuer

30
Translate to French:

When someone sneezes, I always say "Bless you!"

Quand quelqu'un éternue, je dis toujours "À vos souhaits!"

bless you - à vos souhaits. This literally means "to your wishes." When addressing someone with whom you are more familiar, you could say à tes souhaits.