Lecture 1: Pharmacology Orientation and Scope Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Lecture 1: Pharmacology Orientation and Scope Deck (19)
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1

What does each hypertensive pharmalogical suffix mean?

1. -lol
2. -sin
3. -pril
4. -pine
5. -ide

1. beta blocker

2. alpha blocker

3. ACE inhibitor

4. calcium channel blockers

5. diuretic agents

2

What is Functional Antagonism?

2 antagonists interact with different receptors to produce opposite effects

3

What is Chemical Antagonism?

a drug counters the effect of another resulting in decreased effect

4

What is Dispositional Antagonism?

metabolism of a chemical is altered and the concentration/duration of the chemical is diminished

5

What is Receptor Antagonism?

receptor configuration and specificity

6

What are Pharmaceutical Alternatives?

same drugs having different salt/complexes, or different dosage forms/strengths

7

What is Therapeutic Equivalence and what are two things that are expected to be the same between the two?

drugs that are pharmaceutically-equivalent and have same THERAPEUTIC EFFECT and SAFETY PROFILE

8

What is Pharmaceutical Equivalence?

drugs with same ingredients, dosage form/route, and strength/concentration

- brand name vs generic form

9

What is the difference between A and B Codes for Therapeutic Equivalence?

A code - therapeutically equivalent to other pharmaceutically equivalent products

B code - considered NOT to be therapeutically equivalent to other pharmaceutically equivalent products

10

What are the following amounts for:

1. tsp
2. tbsp
3. oz
4. quart
5. pint
6. gallon

1. 5 ml
2. 15 ml (3 tsps)
3. ounce (30 ml or 2 tbsp or 6 tsp)
4. 946 mL (2 pints = 1 quart)
5. 473 mL (16 oz = 1 pint)
6. 3.79 L (4 quarts or 8 pints)

11

What is the Dosage Formula?

(D / H) x Q = individual dosage to be administered

D = doctors order (amount doctor prescribed)
H = amount available at the pharmacy
Q = form of the medication

12

What do these abbreviations mean:

1. q.d.
2. b.i.d.
3. t.i.d.
4. q.i.d.
5. q.o.d.
6. q."x".h.

1. every day or daily

2. twice daily

3. three times daily

4. four times daily

5. every other day

6. every "x" of hours

13

What do these abbreviations mean:

1. q.a.m.
2. q.p.m.
3. q.h.s.
4. p.r.n.
5. a.c.
6. p.c.

1. every morning

2. every evening

3. every night at bedtime

4. as needed

5. before meals

6. after meals

14

What do these abbreviations mean:

1. o.d.
2. o.s.
3. o.u.

4. a.d.
5. a.s.
6. a.u.

7. gtt

1. right eye
2. left eye
3. both eyes

4. right ear
5. left ear
6. both ears

7. drops

15

What do these abbreviations mean:

1. p.o.
2. s.l.

3. i.v.
4. i.m.
5. s.q.
6. p.r.

7. NGT
8. OGT

1. by mouth
2. sublingually (under the tongue)

3. intravenously
4. intramuscular
5. subcutaneously
6. per rectum

7. Naso-Gastric Tube
8. Oro-Gastric Tube

16

What is the difference between:

Schedule 1 Drugs
Schedule 2 Drugs
Schedule 3 Drugs
Schedule 4 Drugs
Schedule 5 Drugs

1. all research use illegal under federal law
- no accepted medical use/high abuse potential

2. no telephone Rx's and no refills
- high abuse potential, severe dependence

3. new Rx written after 6 months or 5 refills
- high abuse potential, severe dependence

4. Rx must be written after 6 months/5 refills
- low abuse potential, low dependence risk

5. non-opioid Rx, dispensed w/o Rx
- limited quantities of certain narcotics

17

What are 4 examples of Schedule 1 drugs? (RMLP)

Rohypnol (Flunitrazepam)
Marijuana (this has most likely changed)
LSD
PCP

18

What are 4 examples of Schedule 2/3 drugs? (OCAP)

Opioids
Cannabinoids
Amphetamines
Phenobarbital

19

What are 3 examples of Schedule 4 drugs? (PPA)

Propoxyphene
Phenteramine
Alprazolam