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Flashcards in KOTV Deck (30)
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1

Who produced KOTV?

Hammer Film Productions

2

Who distributed KOTV?

J. Arthur Rank and Universal.

3

What was KOTV intended to be?

2nd sequel to 1958 Dracula, even though the film's script makes no reference to Stoker's character.

4

What other "Monster Movie" franchises was Hammer successful with by 1963?

"The Mummy", "Frankenstein"

5

What, historically, did 1963 see the early stages of?

"Beatlemania", "swinging-sixties", assassination of JFK and Soviet Union launching the first woman into space.

6

What could the 1960s audience be familiar with?

Codes and conventions of "monster movie" film posters.

7

What are the codes and conventions of "monster movie" film posters?

Composition, fonts, representation of "the monster" and its usually female victims.

8

What connotations does the title create?

Capitalised serif font linked to vampire film genre with its "wooden" styling and the blood dripping from letter Vs "fang".

9

What does the conventional painted main image link to?

Christopher Lee's Dracula, being in colour (anchored by the text "In Eastman Colour") connotes this is a modern telling of an older story.

10

What does the gloomy grey, black and brown colour palette reinforce?

The film's dark, scary conventions.

11

what does the red highlight colour do?

it draws attention to the attacking bats, the vampire and the blood- all key visual signifiers for the genre.

12

How are stars conventionally listed?

Higher paid, male actors first, and in order of fame.

13

How is suspense created?

Enigmas of connoted relationship between male & female vampires (emphasised by "kiss" of title).

14

How can Barthes' Hermeneutic Code be applied?

The fate of the 2 victims, enigma and suspense is created.

15

How can Barthes' Semantic code be applied?

Image of bats and conventional association with vampirism and horror.

16

How is Barthes' Symbolic reinforced?

Horror darkness and fear reinforced through signifiers e.g. moon, male victim's "submissive sacrifice" gesture code.

17

How can binary oppositions be applied?

Opposing representations of vampires and their victims, romantic connotations of "kiss" opposed to stereotypical "vampire" monster.

18

How was the 1960s good for women?

Start of sexual liberation, contraceptive pill 1960.

19

What were women doing in the 1960s?

Entering paid workforce, feminists equal pay, end to sexual; harassment and equality in wider society.

20

When was equal pay legislation passed in America?

1963

21

What could be argued to be encoded in this poster?

"Older" stereotypes of women passive victims of men, modern "male fears" of women challenging male dominance.

22

What do the dress codes reinforce?

Both women play dresses, light material. Reinforce femininity highlights curves and flesh.

23

What is the gesture code of the woman on the left?

Stereotypical passive "monster" victim. Power highlighted by holding her by just one arm.

24

what is different by the 2nd woman's gesture codes?

Barring teeth, arm raised fist-like whole being bitten by bat: more aggressive.

25

How does the male "victim" of the 2nd woman help represent her in a non-stereotypical way?

Submissive pose (on knees, head back, throat exposed).

26

How is the vampire uncharacteristically fearful?

Gesture codes- arms thrown across body defensively, protecting from female vampire?

27

What elements form part of the "shared conceptual road map"
(Hall representation)?

Castle, bats, vampire's cape and dripping blood. This gives meaning to the "world" in poster.

28

What is the audience actively encouraged to do?

Decode the familiar generic iconography (elements of shred conceptual road map)

29

What does the female vampire act as? (Gauntlet's identity)

role model for women struggling against male oppression, or desperate to be seen as equal.

30

How does the female vampire contribute to social change?
(Van Zoonen's feminist)

By assuming "co-antagonist" role, she contributes by representing women in non-traditional roles. Passive female victim reinforces these.