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Flashcards in Integrating Cells Into Tissues Deck (34)
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1

How long can red blood cells be stored at 6 degrees for?

42 days

2

How long can red blood cells be frozen for?

10 years

3

How are cells held together in a tissue?

Attachment to each other- Lateral domain

4

What are the three main types of cell junction?

Tight junction- attach firmly
Desmosomes- further strengthen tight junctions
Gap Junctions- Communication

5

What do tight junctions do?

Tightly connect epithelial cells to each other by fusing the plasmalemma of adjacent epithelial cells which forms a seal and selective barrier

6

What do desmosomes do?

strengthen connections of adjacent cells, next to or under tight junctions, prevent stretching and twisting

7

What do gap junctions do?

Allow cell communications as have channels with allow molecules to pass through allowing messages to be past

8

What is the Basal Domain?

The Basement membrane- cells sit on this

9

How do cells attach to the Basement membrane?

Hemidesmosomes and Focal adhesions

10

Where are Hermidesomsomes found?

Found in tissues subject to abrasion like skin and epithelium of the oral cavity

11

What do focal adhesions do?

Anchor intracellular actin filaments to the basement membrane, role in cell movement like migration of epithelial cells in wound repair

12

What are Integrins?

Transmembrane proteins that attaching the cell cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and sense whether adhesion occurred

13

What is the Integrins main functions?

Attach the cell to the ECM
Signal transduction from ECM to the cell

14

What other functions does the Integrin have?

immune patrolling and cell migration

15

How can tissues be separated?

Collagenase or microdissection

16

What is the problem with cultured cells?

Behave differently and look different to the same cells in tissues, demonstrate contact inhibition, limited life span and demonstrate Senescence

17

What is Autocrine communication?

Targets the cell which secretes the signal

18

What is Paracrine communication?

Targets cells close to the producing cell

19

What is Endocrine communication?

Signal travels through the blood stream to target cells

20

What is synaptic communication?

Where neurotransmitters will diffuse across a synapse to target cell

21

What is Neurocrine communication?

Electrical signal produces a signal which travels through the blood

22

What is necrosis?

Cell death caused by injury, bacterial toxins or nutritional deprivation- cell burst causing damage and inflammation

23

What is apoptosis?

Programmed cell death

24

What parts of the body are static with cell renewal?

CNS, cardiac and skeletal muscle cells

25

What parts of the body are stable with cell renewal?

Fibroblasts, endothelium, smooth muscle cells

26

What parts of the body are renewing with cell renewal?

Blood, skin, gut

27

What are the 4 basic types of tissue?

Epithelial, Muscle, Nerve and Connective tissue

28

Wha are the specialised connective tissues?

Adipose, Lymphatic, Blood, Haemopoietic, Cartilage and Bone

29

What is an epitheloid?

Do not have surface

30

What are microvilli?

cytoplasmic processes that extend from the cell surface