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Stage 3 Human Diseases > HD5 Herpes Virus > Flashcards

Flashcards in HD5 Herpes Virus Deck (57)
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1

What is this:
Herpes Simplex Virus 2

you know herpes, but if recurrent probs this one

2

What is this:
Herpes Simplex Virus 1

you know herpes, if not recurrent probs this one

3

What is this:
Varicella Zoster Virus

this is the chicken pox virus, reactivation causes shingles

4

What is this:
Cytomegalovirus

usaully assymptomatic, can occasionally cause glandular fever in adolescents when contracted, greatest concern is congenital infection and solid organ donners.

5

What is this:
Epstein Barr Virus

- young children ( asymptomatic or sore throat) and adolescents (glandular fever/ infectious mononucleosis)
-the one that causes oral hairy leukoplakia (white patches that cannot be rubbed off, sign pt is immunocompromised)

6

What is this:
Human Herpes Virus 6

Roseola Infantum (rash illness in infants)
Common in infants aged 2 and younger

7

What is this:
Human Herpes Virus 7

Roseola Infantum (rash illness in infants)
Common in infants aged 2 and younger

8

What is this:
Human Herpes Virus 8 (associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma)

Kaposi’s sarcoma associated virus
a type of cancer that can form masses in the skin, lymph nodes, or other organs. The skin lesions are usually purple in color. They can occur singularly, in a limited area, or be widespread.

9

1)How long do cold sores last?
2)(typically where are the lesions, and where can they be rarely?)
3) what is the treatment for cold sores?
4) what are the triggers of cold sores?

1) 5-12 days
2) typically at vermillion border of lips, rarely intra-oral (but still can be)
3) 5% Aciclovir (most effective during active replicaiton, usually can feel tingling or itching before vesicles
4) many: including UV radiation, cold, menstruation, fever, stress

10

1)How long do cold sores last?
2)(typically where are the lesions, and where can they be rarely?)
3) what is the treatment for cold sores?
4) what are the triggers of cold sores?

1) 5-12 days
2) typically at vermillion border of lips, rarely intra-oral (but still can be)
3) 5% Aciclovir (most effective during active replicaiton, usually can feel tingling or itching before vesicles
4) many: including UV radiation, cold, menstruation, fever, stress

11

Which HSV 1 or 2, usually causes meningitis?

HSV2

12

what is meningitis known as if it is recurrent ?

mollaret's meningitis

13

What are the main complications of HSV 1 or 2?
(6)

1. secondary bacterial infections
2. corneal ulcers
3. meningitis
4. herpes simplex encephalitis
5. neonatal herpes simplex (life threatening (mother gives birth to baby before she has time to develop immunity)
6. death (in immunocomprimised)

14

HSV in genitals, reactivation is usually HSV __a__.
the pimmary infection is _b_

a)2
b) either

15

in genital HSV, what is worse primary or reactivation infection, which can be asymptomatic?

primmary is worse, secondary can be assymptomatic

16

What type of infections can HSV cause?

1) oral manifestation
2) genitals
3) hands = herpetic whitlow (most common amongest dentists, lesions on hands)
4) eyes= ocular infection
5) in babies= neonatal infections
6) brain =encephalitis

17

What does a HSV occular infection look like?

a little crack in the jelly of the eye

18

how does HSV infection affect delivery of babies?

if mother has active primary or initial genital HSV at time of delivery then will have a C section, unless recurrent as doesn't out weigh the risks of the C sections

19

describe the mortality of HSV if untreated in babies?

high

20

what 3 parts of the body can neonatal HSV affect?

mucocutaneous only (mildest), primarily
Central Nervous System or Disseminated.

21

What ways can a baby get HSV?

contact during delivery adn post-delivery
(cold sores, asymptomatic shedding in close contacts)

22

What is the most common virus cause of encephalitis?
2) neurological outcome?

HSV
2) poor (high rate of poor neurological outcome)

23

what is the mortality of untreated encephalitis?
2) what is the treatment?

70%
2) Mimimum of 10 days treatment with intravenous aciclovir is needed
(most would give 21 days).

24

What are the methods of detecting HSV?

Direct Viral Detection (PCR = polymerase chain reaction)
 Lesion swab
 Cerebrospinal fluid

25

What is the action of aciclovir, valaciclovir and zovirax?

inhibit viral polymerase

26

what is zovirax?
2) when is it most effective?

1) topical form of aciclovir
2) before lesion has fully formed

27

What is valaciclovir?
2) what are the benefits and draw backs?

prodrug of acyclovir, metabolised into aciclovir
2) good oral bioavailability, but more expensive

28

What is valaciclovir?
2) what are the benefits and draw backs?

prodrug of acyclovir, metabolised into aciclovir
2) good oral bioavailability, but more expensive

29

What is the viral enzyme that activates aciclovir?
2) what is the benefit of this?
3) what are the disadvantages of aciclovir compared to valaciclovir?

thymidine kinase
2) specific to infected cells
3) poor oral bioavailability, 5 times per day dosing

30

What is the viral enzyme that activates aciclovir?
2) what is the benefit of this?
3) what are the disadvantages of aciclovir compared to valaciclovir?

thymidine kinase
2) specific to infected cells
3) poor oral bioavailability, 5 times per day dosing