Dermatology - Fleas Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Dermatology - Fleas Deck (89)
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1

What is the most commonly identified flea on the dog and cat?

Ctenocephalides felis

2

Aside of Ctenocephalides felis, what other flea species can be found in some geographical regions of North America?

Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex simulans, and Echidnophaga gallinacea

3

What is the life cycle of Ctenocephalides felis?

eggs, 3 larval stages, pupa, adult

4

Are fleas host specific?

no

5

What is key for flea development?

microenvironment - temperature and humidity deep in a pile carpet may support survival

6

What disease(conditions) are caused by fleas?

mechanical irritation, anemia, they are vectors of disease, dermatological conditions, and flea allergies

7

What diseases are fleas carriers for?

Diplidium caninum, Yersinia pestis, FeLV (potentially), Hemobartonella

8

What dermatological lesions do fleas cause?

skin disease and mild-moderate pruritus caused by bitiing of the flea

9

What is the philosophy for controlling fleas?

Must control the flea population on the pet AND in the environment, all pets in the household should be treated, and the least toxic insecticides (that will work) should be used

10

What are the important properties of insecticides?

Cost, availability to the veterinarian or pet owner, esthetics to the owner, efficacy, ease of application to the pet or in the environment, and safety

11

What are the inert insecticides?

Fine powders, diatamacious earth, and borates

12

How do fine powders work?

they breech the insect's exoskeleton by chafing

13

What is the risk with using diatamacious earth?

it can become aerosolized and cause pulmonary disease in humans

14

How do borates work in flea infestations?

They are applied to the environment and act as dessicants (drying agents) and can also cause intestinal poisons if ingested

15

What botanicals can be used for flea control?

Pyrethrins, synthetics pyrethrins, rotenone, and citrus derivatives

16

What organochlorines is used for flea control?

Lindane

17

What organophosphate is recommended as an environmental spray for flea control?

Malathion

18

What insecticide works as a neurotoxin available as a topical pour on and what species is it approved for?

Imidocloprid (Advantage and Advantage-Multi) for use in dogs and cats over 4 months of age

19

What type of insecticide is K9advantix?

Imidocloprid combined with 44% permethrin - note: not labeled for cats

20

What is the generic name for Capstar and what does it target?

Nitenpyram - it is an orally administed insecticide that is highly affected in killing adult feeding fleas - death occurs within a few hours

21

What animals can be given Capstar?

Dogs and cats 4 weeks or older and at least 2 pounds

22

What is the generic name for Frontline, what type of insecticide is it and how does it work?

Fipronil, a phenylpyrazole insecticide, it acts as a neurotoxin

23

How is Frontline given and to what animals?

It is available as a topical spray for dogs and cats down to 8 weeks of age

24

What is Frontline Plus made out of?

Fipronil in combination with methoprene

25

What is the generic name for Revolution, how does it work, and how is it used?

Selamectin - it is a neurotoxin recommended as a monthly topical pour on insecticide

26

Aside from fleas, what is Selamectin labeled for use against?

scabies, ear mites, internal parasites, and for tick control

27

What drugs are in Advantage Multi?

Imidocloprid and moxidectin

28

What is the primary role for moxidectin in Advantage Multi?

for heartworm control

29

What is ProMeris made out of?

Metaflumazone and amitraz

30

How does ProMeris work?

It is a neurotoxin that blocks sodium influx to disrupt feeding, incoordination, paralysis, and death of the flea

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