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Flashcards in Chapter 5 EMS Communications Deck (78)
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1

1. When providing patient care, it is MOST important that you maintain effective communication with:
A) the dispatcher.
B) bystanders.
C) medical control.
D) your partner.

Ans: D
Page: 130
Type: General Knowledge

2

2. A backup communication system is especially critical when dealing with:
A) mass-casualty incidents.
B) motor-vehicle collisions.
C) simultaneous EMS calls.
D) any critically injured patient.

Ans: A
Page: 121
Type: General Knowledge

3

3. Notification of EMS usually occurs when:
A) EMTs contact an emergency medical dispatcher.
B) a bystander notifies the dispatcher via telephone.
C) a sick or injured patient presents to your EMS station.
D) law enforcement requests assistance via two-way radio.

Ans: B
Page: 131
Type: General Knowledge

4

4. A _____________ receives a weak signal and retransmits it at a higher power on another frequency.
A) repeater
B) base station
C) multiplex system
D) duplex system

Ans: A
Page: 122
Type: General Knowledge

5

5. The combination of two or more signals, which allows the paramedic to talk and transmit an ECG simultaneously on one frequency, is called a:
A) simplex system.
B) trunking system.
C) multiplex system.
D) half-duplex system.

Ans: C
Page: 123
Type: General Knowledge

6

6. Under the instructions of a good EMD, a layperson should be able to:
A) obtain a blood pressure.
B) assess a patient's pupils.
C) immobilize a person's spine.
D) perform chest compressions.

Ans: D
Page: 132
Type: General Knowledge

7

7. Which of the following statements regarding 12-lead ECG telemetry is correct?
A) Telemetry over UHF frequencies enables transmission and analysis of all 12 leads.
B) Telemetry has never proven to increase diagnosis times for patients with a cardiac event.
C) Most newer systems use facsimile technology to allow transmission of 12-lead ECGs.
D) A decoder is required to ensure that voice communication does not filter out the ECG.

Ans: C
Page: 124-126
Type: General Knowledge

8

8. The term “frequency,” as it applies to radio communications, is MOST accurately defined as:
A) how frequently a radio wave recurs in a given time.
B) a predefined station designed for emergency use only.
C) a relatively long wavelength that produces audible sound.
D) the number of megahertz per cycle that the radio transmits.

Ans: A
Page: 122
Type: General Knowledge

9

9. Low-band frequencies:
A) have a range of up to 500 miles and are not associated with skip interference.
B) are unpredictable because changes in ionospheric conditions may cause losses in communication.
C) function at 150 to 175 MHz and have a range that is nearly triple that of high-band frequencies.
D) have a longer range than high-band frequencie, but are more readily absorbed by rain, trees, and brush.

Ans: B
Page: 122
Type: General Knowledge

10

10. The ability of multiple agencies or systems to share the same radio frequency is called:
A) a duplex.
B) trunking.
C) patching.
D) telemetry.

Ans: B
Page: 123
Type: General Knowledge

11

11. Biotelemetry is MOST accurately defined as:
A) linking two frequencies together so that the paramedic and physician can converse directly.
B) a common radio frequency assigned to EMS by the Federal Communications Commission.
C) the ability of more than one public safety agency to share the same radio frequency during a crisis.
D) the capability of measuring vital signs and ECG tracings and transmitting them to a distant terminal.

Ans: D
Page: 124
Type: General Knowledge

12

12. All of the following factors may cause distortion of an ECG signal, EXCEPT:
A) muscle tremors.
B) loose electrodes.
C) severe tachycardia.
D) distant transmission range.

Ans: C
Page: 125
Type: General Knowledge

13

13. At minimum, sending the 12-lead ECG of a patient with chest pain to the emergency department physician via telemetry would:
A) decrease the time from diagnosis to treatment.
B) enable the paramedic to begin treatment in the field.
C) decrease the likelihood of prehospital cardiac arrest.
D) allow the physician to choose the appropriate fibrinolytic.

Ans: A
Page: 125
Type: General Knowledge

14

14. Cellular telephones are more advantageous than regular two-way radios in that cellular telephones:
A) enable laypeople to call 9-1-1 for a minimal service charge.
B) incorporate GPS technology to help rescuers find the patient.
C) can transmit long distances with the use of a mobile antenna.
D) do not utilize computer technology and are less likely to fail.

Ans: B
Page: 124
Type: General Knowledge

15

15. In order for the paramedic to talk and transmit an ECG simultaneously on one frequency, a __________ system is required.
A) duplex
B) simplex
C) low-band
D) multiplex

Ans: D
Page: 123
Type: General Knowledge

16

16. Radio transmission distances from a mobile transceiver are reduced:
A) by fog or light rain.
B) over mountainous areas.
C) over water or flat terrain.
D) with greater than 7.5 W of power.

Ans: B
Page: 122
Type: General Knowledge

17

17. A(n) __________ receives a weak signal and retransmits it at a higher power on another frequency.
A) duplex
B) simplex
C) repeater
D) encoder

Ans: C
Page: 122
Type: General Knowledge

18

18. A base station decoder within the emergency department:
A) amplifies the voice signal from the field transmitter.
B) is used to increase the range of the radio transmission.
C) translates a telemetry signal into an oscilloscope tracing.
D) converts a low-band frequency to a high-band frequency.

Ans: C
Page: 122
Type: General Knowledge

19

19. Which of the following statements regarding the use of cellular telephones and landline telephones is MOST correct?
A) Cellular and landline telephones overcome problems caused by overcrowded EMS radio frequencies.
B) Cellular phones are more expensive than radios and give a weaker signal.
C) Landline phones are in a fixed location and transmit with a simplex system.
D) Cellular phones do not rely on a repeater to increase the coverage distance.

Ans: A
Page: 124
Type: General Knowledge

20

20. When communicating medical information via radio, you should be:
A) thorough yet rapid.
B) comprehensive but brief.
C) as expeditious as possible.
D) simple, brief, and direct.

Ans: D
Page: 126
Type: General Knowledge

21

21. The FIRST principle of communicating by radio is:
A) clarity.
B) accuracy.
C) calmness.
D) thoroughness.

Ans: A
Page: 126-127
Type: General Knowledge

22

22. When transmitting information via radio, you should:
A) break long messages into 60-second segments.
B) use a normal conversational tone of voice.
C) speak with your voice slightly elevated.
D) keep your mouth 1" from the microphone.

Ans: B
Page: 127
Type: General Knowledge

23

23. When transmitting data over the radio, you should NOT disclose the patient's:
A) vital signs.
B) chief complaint.
C) HIV status.
D) age and sex.

Ans: C
Page: 127
Type: General Knowledge

24

24. Which of the following words would be the MOST difficult to hear over the radio?
A) Yes
B) Negative
C) Affirmative
D) Received

Ans: A
Page: 128
Type: General Knowledge

25

25. When transmitting your radio report to the hospital, you should:
A) use ten-codes whenever possible.
B) allow the patient to hear the report.
C) answer questions with the word “yes.”
D) not be sitting right next to the patient.

Ans: D
Page: 128
Type: General Knowledge

26

26. The use of ten-codes over the radio:
A) should be carried out whenever possible to ensure effective communication.
B) is not recommended by the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
C) increases the likelihood of miscommunication during the radio transmission.
D) is prohibited by the Federal Communications Commission and should be avoided.

Ans: B
Page: 128
Type: General Knowledge

27

27. When relaying medical information to a physician in person, you should:
A) include information that you did not provide during your radio report.
B) provide a lengthy, detailed report that includes all patient information.
C) ensure that another physician or a nurse is present to avoid confusion.
D) routinely give your report at the patient's bedside so he or she can hear.

Ans: A
Page: 130
Type: General Knowledge

28

28. Which of the following patient data is NOT typically communicated during your radio report to the hospital?
A) Brief, pertinent history
B) Underlying medical conditions
C) The patient's ethnicity
D) ECG findings

Ans: C
Page: 129-130
Type: General Knowledge

29

29. When a panicked person calls 9-1-1 for help:
A) he or she needs immediate confirmation of having reached the right number.
B) the emergency medical dispatcher must answer the phone within four or five rings.
C) the dispatcher should not speak to the caller until the caller has calmed down.
D) an ambulance should be dispatched before the nature of the problem is known.

Ans: A
Page: 131
Type: General Knowledge

30

30. Which of the following details is of LEAST importance for the EMD to obtain from the caller?
A) The exact location of the patient
B) An estimate of the situation's severity
C) The caller's telephone number
D) The patient's last known oral intake

Ans: D
Page: 131-132
Type: General Knowledge