Chapter 20 - Psychotropic Medications, Alcohol, And Drug Abuse Flashcards Preview

Pharmacology > Chapter 20 - Psychotropic Medications, Alcohol, And Drug Abuse > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 20 - Psychotropic Medications, Alcohol, And Drug Abuse Deck (24)
Loading flashcards...
1

Addiction

(P. 388 and 583)

Physical and/or psychological dependence on a substance, especially alcohol or drugs, with the use of increasing amounts (tolerance) and withdrawal reactions.

2

Antidepressant

(P. 369 and 584)

Medications used to treat patients with various types of depression; sometimes called mood elevators.

3

Antipsychotic

(P. 381 and 584)

Major tranquilizers used to relieve the symptom of psychoses or severe neuroses; sometimes called neuroleptics.

4

Anxiolytics

(P. 377-380 and 585)

Antianxiety medications (tranquilizers) used for the short-term treatment of anxiety disorders, neurosis, some psychosomatic disorders and insomnia.

5

Ataxia

(P. 378 and 585)

Defective muscular coordination, especially with voluntary muscular movements (e.g., walking).

6

Atypical antipsychotics

(P. 381 and 585)

A newer class of antipsychotics with less potential for adverse effects, such as extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia.

7

Bipolar disorders

(P. 375 and 585)

Manic-depressive mental disorders in which the mood fluctuates from mania to depression.

8

Chemical dependency

(P. 388 and 586)

Condition in which alcohol or drugs have taken control of an individual's life and affect normal functioning.

9

Extrapyramidal (EPS)

(P. 381 and 588)

Disorder of the brain characterized by tremors, Parkinson-like symptoms, dystonic twisting of body parts, or tardive dyskinesia, sometimes associated with prolonged use of antipsychotic drugs and some other CNS drugs.

10

Heterocyclic

(P. 373 and 589)

Second-generation cyclic antidepressants with very different adverse effect profiles.

11

Monoamine oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

(P. 369, 370 and 591)

Antidepressant agents used to increase serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine levels.

12

Neurotransmitters

(P. 368 and 591)

Substances that travel across the synapse to transmit messages between nerve cells.

13

Psychotropic

(P. 363 and 593)

Any substance that acts on the mind.

14

Selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)

(P. 369, 372, 373 and 594)

Antidepressants that block the reabsorption of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine thus helping to restore the brain's chemical balance.

15

Selective serotonin reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

(P. 369, 371 and 594)

Antidepressant that block the reabsorption of the neurotransmitter serotonin, thus helping to restore the brain's chemical balance.

16

Tardive dyskinesia (TD)

(P. 381 and 595)

Slow, rhythmical, stereotyped, involuntary movements such as tics.

17

Tricyclics

(P. 369 and 595)

Antidepressants that elevate the mood, have a mild sedative effect, and increased appetite.

18

Psychotropic medications can be classified according to the purpose of Administration. The five classes are:

(P. 363)

1. Central Nervous System (CNS) Stimulants

2. Antidepressants

3. Anoxiolytics

4. Antimanic Agents

5. Antipsychotic Medications

19

The five categories of Antidepressants are:

(P. 369)

1. Tricyclic Antidepressants

2. Monoamine oxidase Inhibitors (MOAIs)

3. Selective serotonin reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

4. Selective norepinephrine reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)

5. Heterocyclic antidepressants

20

Antipsychotic Medications, or major tranquilizers, are sometimes called neuroleptics and consist of ____________

(P. 381)

• traditional or typical (first-generation) agents

• the newer or atypical (second-generation) agents

21

Antipsychotic Medications are useful in two major areas:

(P. 381)

1. Relieving symptoms of psychoses, including delusion, hallucinations, agitation, and combativeness.

2. Relieving nausea and vomiting, for example prochlorperazine (Compazine).

22

Symptoms of Alchohol Poisoning are:

(P. 389)

• cold
• clammy skin
• stupor
• slow, noisy respirations
• alcohol breath

23

Four types of substances that can be produced illegally:

(P. 392)

• amphetamines
• marijuana
• cocaine
• hallucinogens (LSD and PCP)

24

Although Amphetamines can be produced and prescribed legally, they are also produced in illegal labs. Two examples are:

(P. 392)

1. Methamphetamine
• crystal
• crank
• ice
• meth
• speed

2. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)
• Ecstasyl