Chap 14 Pretest critical thinking Flashcards Preview

homework and test > Chap 14 Pretest critical thinking > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chap 14 Pretest critical thinking Deck (20)
Loading flashcards...
0

The first cornerstone of effective paramedic practice is your ability to:
A) decide, improvise, and act on available information
B) develop and implement a patient care plan.
C) determine which information is valid or invalid.
D) gather, evaluate, and synthesize information.

D

1

Concept formation is the process of:
A) gathering information from family and bystanders.
B) formulating a plan based on the scene size-up.
C) gathering information that you see, hear, smell, or feel.
D) beginning to develop a plan based on dispatch information.

C

2

In documentation, what things could be important that new paramedics may NOT consider documenting?
A) Darkness, limited access, and unruly crowds
B) Uncooperative patient and altered level of consciousness
C) A patient’s explanation as to why a situation happened
D) Who was on scene and for how long

A

3

Protocols (or standing orders) are:
A) for determining the priorities and establishing a working diagnosis.
B) subjective on the part of the paramedic.
C) for defining regional, state, and national standards of care.
D) for defining the standard of care for certain illnesses and injuries.

D

4

Accurate data interpretation involves what?
A) Hands-on experience—your own and what your partner can provide
B) Good background in anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology, and experience
C) Your experience and knowledge of anatomy and physiology, as well as the advice of medical control
D) Your experience as well as any unusual presentation(s) the family can provide about the patient

B

5

What is your treatment plan guided by?
A) Standard operating procedures
B) Patient care protocols
C) National standards
D) Online medical direction

B

6

It is imperative for a paramedic to quickly establish whether a patient is:
A) sick or not sick.
B) severely or mildly sick.
C) in pain or not.
D) mobile or bedridden.

A

7

An example of a serious condition that is life threatening is:
A) acute presentation of chronic conditions.
B) partial-thickness burns.
C) multisystem trauma.
D) end-stage disease presentation.

C

8

Are the actions and attitudes of family or friends around the patient important in any way?
A) Rarely
B) Never
C) Sometimes
D) Family only

C

9

What is the “patient’s affect”?
A) How the patient’s condition affects you when you arrive on scene
B) How the patient reacts when you arrive on scene and introduce yourself
C) How the patient appears physically during your initial impression
D) The patient’s emotional state reflected in physical behavior

D

10

What is a working diagnosis?
A) A diagnosis that allows for changes if needed
B) A set diagnosis that stays with the patient
C) The initial diagnosis made from the scene size-up
D) The diagnosis made by the attending physician

A

11

The evaluation of information that you have gathered is known as:
A) information management.
B) data interpretation.
C) patient documentation.
D) run debriefing.

B

12

Beyond documenting any medications given, what else is imperative to document?
A) The trade and generic name of all medications given
B) The names of any medications refused by the patient
C) The effects, if any, of the medications given
D) Any negative effects produced by the medications

C

13

What is medical ambiguity?
A) Uncertainty about who would better treat the patient—you or your partner
B) Uncertainty regarding the specific cause of the patient’s condition
C) Uncertainty about whether or not to call medical control
D) Uncertainty about which protocol to follow in a given situation

B

14

What is thinking while doing known as?
A) Reflection in action
B) Working diagnosis
C) Patient debriefing
D) Information management

A

15

What are the “Six Rs” of critical thinking, in order?
A) Read the protocols, react to scene, read patient, reevaluate, remain calm, results of your treatment
B) Read scene, reevaluate, read patient, repetition, revise plan, review your performance
C) Read patient, respond to the scene, reevaluate, react, revise plan, review procedures
D) Read scene, read patient, react, reevaluate, revise plan, review your performance

D

16

In reading a patient quickly, how would you assess the Glasgow Coma Scale score without walking through and scoring each step?
A) Introduce yourself, ask why 9-1-1 was called, observe responses by family members, and watch the patient’s psychomotor abilities.
B) Get as much information from the family or friends as possible, then introduce yourself to the patient and see if the information obtained matches up.
C) Approach the patient and notice if the patient follows you with his or her eyes, extend your hand to shake, introduce yourself, and ask why 9-1-1 was
D) Introduce yourself, and ask the patient his or her name, what day it is, why 9-1-1 was called, and who the president is.

C

17

What is the practice of following steps without thinking about what you are doing?
A) Prehospital medicine
B) Cookbook medicine
C) Emergency medicine
D) Procedural medicine

B

18

If you have NOT been able to establish a working diagnosis, what is your next step?
A) Provide care based on presenting signs and symptoms.
B) Call medical control and present all findings.
C) Withhold treatment until a working diagnosis is made.
D) Rush the patient to the hospital for ED physician evaluation.

A

19

If you are only transferring a patient from one location to another, is it necessary to obtain vital signs?
A) Yes, baseline vitals are always needed.
B) Yes, doing so makes you appear professional.
C) No, a short transfer of a stable patient does not require vital signs.
D)Vital signs are only required if something appears to be going wrong.

A