CH14 - Male Genital System Pathology Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in CH14 - Male Genital System Pathology Deck (136)
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1

What is the hypospadias?

Opening of urethra on inferior surface of penis

2

What is hypospadias due to?

failure of the urethral folds to dose

3

What is epispadias?

opening of urethra on superior surface of penis

4

What is epispadias due to?

abnormal positioning of the genital tubercle

5

What is epispadias associated with?

bladder exstrophy

6

What is condyloma acuminatum?

Benign warty growth on genital skin

7

What is condyloma acuminatum due to?

HPV type 6 or 11; characterized by koilocytic change

8

What is lymphogranuloma venereum?

Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the inguinal lymphatics and lymph nodes

9

What is lymphogranuloma venereum caused by?

sexually transmitted disease caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (serotypes L1-L3)

10

What eventually happens to lymphogranuloma venereum?

it heals with fibrosis; perianal involvement may result in rectal stricture

11

What is squamous cell carcinoma for the penis?

Malignant proliferation of squamous cells of penile skin

12

What are the risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis?

1) high risk HPV (2/3 of cases) 2) Lack of circumcision

13

Why is a lack of circumcision a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis?

foreskin acts as a nidus for inflammation and irritation if not properly maintained

14


In squamous cell carcinoma of the penis what are the precursor in situ lesions?



1) Bowen disease 2) Erythroplasia of Queyrat 3) Bowenoid papulosis (only CIS with no predisposition for invasion)


15

What is Bowen disease?

in situ carcinoma of the penile shaft or scrotum that presents as leukoplakia

16

What is erythroplasia of queyrat?

in situ carcinoma on the glans that presents as erythroplakia

17

What is bowenoid papulosis?

in situ carcinoma that presents as multiple reddish papules

18

In whom is bowenoid papulosis seen?

Seen in younger patients (40s) relative to Bowen disease and erythroplasia of Queyrat

19

How invasive is bowenoid papulosis?

Does not progress to invasive carcinoma

20

What is cryptorchidism?

Failure of testicle to descend into the scrotal sac

21

Where do the testicles normally develop?

in the abdomen and then descend into the scrotal sac as the fetus grows.

22

What is the most common congenital male reproductive abnormality and how often is it seen?

Cryptorchidism and is seen in 1% of male infants

23

What is orchiopexy?

Operation to bring undescended testicle into scrotum

24

What happens in most cases of cryptorchidism?

most cases resolve spontaneously; otherwise, orchiopexy is performed before 2 years of age.

25

What are the complications for cryptorchidism?

they include testicular atrophy with infertility and increased risk for seminoma.

26

What is orchitis?

Inflammation of the testicle

27

What are the causes for orchitis?

1) Chlamydia trachomatis (serotypes D-K) or Neisseria gonorrhoeae 2) Escherichia coli and Pseadomonas 3) mumps virus 4) autoimmune orchitis

28

In whom is orchitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (serotypes D-K) or Neisseria gonorrhoeae seen in and what happens as a result?

young adults. Increased risk of sterility, but libido is not affected because Leydig cells are spared.

29

In whom is orchitis caused by Escherichia coli and Pseadomonas seen in and what happens as a result?

older adults and what results is that urinary tract infection pathogens spread into the reproductive tract.

30

In whom is orchitis caused by the mumps virus seen and what is the result?

Seen in teenage males and there is an increased risk for infertility; testicular inflammation is usually not seen in children < 10 years old.